Skivered vs Slivered - What's the difference?

skivered | slivered |


As verbs the difference between skivered and slivered

is that skivered is (skiver) while slivered is (sliver).

skivered

English

Verb

(head)
  • (skiver)

  • skiver

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who uses a skive (or skives).
  • A slacker.
  • (dialect) A skewer.
  • An inferior quality of leather, made of split sheepskin, tanned by immersion in sumac, and dyed, formerly used for hat linings, pocketbooks, bookbinding, etc.
  • The cutting tool or machine used in splitting leather or skins.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To skewer, impale.
  • *1863 , Le Fanu,
  • [...] 'it's I that wishes I could be sure 'twas malice, I'd skiver you, heels and elbows, on my sword, and roast you alive on that fire.
  • *1887 , Thomas Hardy, The Woodlanders ,
  • I'll finish heating the oven, and set you free to go and skiver up them ducks.
    ---- ==Norwegian Bokmål==

    Noun

  • ----

    slivered

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (sliver)
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    sliver

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A long piece cut or rent off; a sharp, slender fragment; a splinter.
  • * 2013 , . Melbourne, Australia: The Text Publishing Company. chapter 27. p. 270.
  • *:A sliver of bone has punctured a lung, and a small surgical operation was needed to remove it (would he like to keep the bone as a memento?--it is in a phial by his bedside).
  • A strand, or slender roll, of cotton or other fiber in a loose, untwisted state, produced by a carding machine and ready for the roving or slubbing which precedes spinning.
  • Bait made of pieces of small fish. Compare kibblings.
  • (US, New York) A narrow high-rise apartment building.
  • Synonyms

    * (long piece cut or rent off) shard, slice, splinter

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cut or divide into long, thin pieces, or into very small pieces; to cut or rend lengthwise; to slit.
  • to sliver wood
    (Shakespeare)
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • They'll sliver thee like a turnip.

    Anagrams

    * *