Sticky vs Slime - What's the difference?

sticky | slime |


As nouns the difference between sticky and slime

is that sticky is a sticky note, such as a post-it note while slime is soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.

As verbs the difference between sticky and slime

is that sticky is (internet|bulletin boards) to fix a thread at the top of the list of topics or threads so as to keep it in view while slime is to coat with slime.

As an adjective sticky

is able or likely to stick.

sticky

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Able or likely to stick.
  • Is this tape sticky enough to stay on that surface?
  • Potentially difficult to escape from.
  • This is a sticky situation. We could be in this for weeks if we're not careful.
  • * 2014 , Michael White, " Roll up, roll up! The Amazing Salmond will show a Scotland you won't believe", The Guardian , 8 September 2014:
  • Salmond studied medieval Scottish history as well as economics at university so he cannot say he has not had fair warning – it was even more turbulent and bloody than England at that time – and plenty of Scotland's kings and leaders came to a sticky end.
  • (computing, informal, of a setting) Persistent.
  • We should make the printing direction sticky so the user doesn't have to keep setting it.
  • (computing, of a window) Appearing on all virtual desktops.
  • (Internet, of threads on a bulletin board) Fixed at the top of the list of topics or threads so as to keep it in view.
  • (Internet, of a website) Compelling enough to keep visitors from leaving.
  • A woman has come to me with the complaint that her website is not "sticky" - 70% of the visits last 30 seconds or less.
  • Of weather, hot and windless and with high humidity, so that people feel sticky from sweating.
  • Derived terms

    * stickily * stickiness * sticky-backed plastic * sticky bit * sticky fingers * sticky wicket * sticky note

    See also

    * tacky

    Noun

    (stickies)
  • A sticky note, such as a post-it note.
  • Her desk is covered with yellow stickies .
  • (manufacturing) A small adhesive particle found in wastepaper.
  • A sweet dessert wine.
  • Verb

  • (Internet, bulletin boards) to fix a thread at the top of the list of topics or threads so as to keep it in view.
  • slime

    English

    Noun

  • Soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As it [the Nile] ebbs, the seedsman / Upon the slime and ooze scatters his grain.
  • Any mucilaginous substance; or a mucus-like substance which exudes from the bodies of certain animals, such as snails or slugs.
  • A sneaky, unethical person; a slimeball.
  • * 2005 , G. E. Nordell, Backlot Requiem: A Rick Walker Mystery
  • If this guy knows who killed Robert, the right thing to do is to tell the police. If he doesn't know, really, then he's an opportunistic slime . It's still blackmail.
  • (figuratively, obsolete) Human flesh, seen disparagingly; mere human form.
  • * , II.x:
  • th'eternall Lord in fleshly slime / Enwombed was, from wretched Adams line / To purge away the guilt of sinfull crime [...].
  • (obsolete) = ((l))
  • *
  • And they said one to another, Go to, let us make brick, and burn them thoroughly. And they had brick for stone, and slime had they for morter.

    Derived terms

    * slime mold * pink slime

    Synonyms

    * (any substance of a dirty nature) sludge

    Verb

    (slim)
  • To coat with slime.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=7 citation , passage=‘Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. […]’}}
  • (figuratively) To besmirch or disparage.
  • Anagrams

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