Slive vs Slime - What's the difference?

slive | slime |


As verbs the difference between slive and slime

is that slive is (transitive|obsolete|or|dialectal) to cut; split; separate or slive can be (dialectal|northern england|scotland) to sneak; skulk; proceed in a sly way; creep while slime is to coat with slime.

As nouns the difference between slive and slime

is that slive is (dialectal) a slice or sliver; , chip while slime is soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.

slive

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) sliven, from (etyl) .

Verb

  • (transitive, obsolete, or, dialectal) To cut; split; separate.
  • (transitive, obsolete, or, dialectal, chiefly, Scotland) To cut or slice something off; separate by slicing.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dialectal) A slice or sliver; , chip.
  • Etymology 2

    Perhaps related to (l).

    Verb

  • (dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To sneak; skulk; proceed in a sly way; creep.
  • Anagrams

    *

    slime

    English

    Noun

  • Soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive; bitumen; mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As it [the Nile] ebbs, the seedsman / Upon the slime and ooze scatters his grain.
  • Any mucilaginous substance; or a mucus-like substance which exudes from the bodies of certain animals, such as snails or slugs.
  • A sneaky, unethical person; a slimeball.
  • * 2005 , G. E. Nordell, Backlot Requiem: A Rick Walker Mystery
  • If this guy knows who killed Robert, the right thing to do is to tell the police. If he doesn't know, really, then he's an opportunistic slime . It's still blackmail.
  • (figuratively, obsolete) Human flesh, seen disparagingly; mere human form.
  • * , II.x:
  • th'eternall Lord in fleshly slime / Enwombed was, from wretched Adams line / To purge away the guilt of sinfull crime [...].
  • (obsolete) = ((l))
  • *
  • And they said one to another, Go to, let us make brick, and burn them thoroughly. And they had brick for stone, and slime had they for morter.

    Derived terms

    * slime mold * pink slime

    Synonyms

    * (any substance of a dirty nature) sludge

    Verb

    (slim)
  • To coat with slime.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=7 citation , passage=‘Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. […]’}}
  • (figuratively) To besmirch or disparage.
  • Anagrams

    * * *