Far vs Slight - What's the difference?

far | slight | Related terms |

Far is a related term of slight.


As nouns the difference between far and slight

is that far is accident, anger, calamity or far can be sheep while slight is the act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy.

As an adjective slight is

small, weak or gentle; not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe.

As a verb slight is

to treat as slight or not worthy of attention, to make light of.

far

English

(wikipedia far)

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Remote in space.
  • Remote in time.
  • Long.
  • More remote or longer of two.
  • * , chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=At the far end of the houses the head gardener stood waiting for his mistress, and he gave her strips of bass to tie up her nosegay. This she did slowly and laboriously, with knuckly old fingers that shook.}}
  • Extreme.
  • Widely different in nature or quality; opposite in character.
  • * F. Anstey
  • He was far from ill looking, though he thought himself still farther.
  • (computing, not comparable) Outside the currently selected segment in a segmented memory architecture.
  • Antonyms
    * (remote in space) close, near

    Derived terms

    * afar * as far as * by far * faraway * far from * far off * how far * so far * thus far

    Adverb

    (en-adv)
  • Distant in space, time or degree.
  • :
  • *
  • *:It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
  • To or from a great distance, time, or degree.
  • :
  • (lb) Very much.
  • :
  • *{{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 5, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool , passage=The Reds were on the back foot early on when a catalogue of defensive errors led to Ramires giving Chelsea the lead. Jay Spearing conceded possession in midfield and Ramires escaped Jose Enrique far too easily before scoring at the near post with a shot Reina should have saved.}}

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Spelt (type of wheat).
  • A young pig, or a litter of pigs.
  • Statistics

    *

    slight

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Small, weak or gentle; not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Slight is the subject, but not so the praise.
  • * (John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • Some firmly embrace doctrines upon slight grounds.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers), title=(A Cuckoo in the Nest)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Mother very rightly resented the slightest hint of condescension. She considered that the exclusiveness of Peter's circle was due not to its distinction, but to the fact that it was an inner Babylon of prodigality and whoredom,
  • Not stout or heavy; slender.
  • * Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • his own figure, which was formerly so slight
  • (obsolete) Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.
  • (Hudibras)

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * slightish * slightly * slightness

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To treat as slight or not worthy of attention, to make light of.
  • * Cowper
  • the wretch who slights the bounty of the skies
  • To treat with disdain or neglect.
  • To act negligently or carelessly.
  • (military, of a fortification) To render no longer defensible by full or partial demolition.
  • (Clarendon)
  • To make even or level.
  • (Hexham)
  • To throw heedlessly.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The rogue slighted me into the river.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * slightingly

    Noun

    (wikipedia slight) (en noun)
  • The act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy.
  • * (Benjamin Franklin)
  • Never use a slighting expression to her, even in jest; for slights in jest, after frequent bandyings, are apt to end in angry earnest.
  • Sleight.
  • (Spenser)

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * put a slight upon

    References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * lights