Exiguous vs Slight - What's the difference?

exiguous | slight | Related terms |

Exiguous is a related term of slight.


As adjectives the difference between exiguous and slight

is that exiguous is scanty; meager while slight is small, weak or gentle; not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe.

As a verb slight is

to treat as slight or not worthy of attention, to make light of.

As a noun slight is

the act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy.

exiguous

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • scanty; meager
  • * 1889 — ch XIII
  • The herdboy in the broom, already musical in the days of Father Chaucer, startles (and perhaps pains) the lark with this exiguous pipe.
  • * 1912 — ch VII
  • The path on which I then planted my feet was quite unprecedentedly narrow. I had never had to walk along a thoroughfare so exiguous .
  • * 1998 — Michael Ignatieff, Rebirth of a Nation: An Anatomy of Russia . New Statesman, Feb 6.
  • They are entering the market, setting up stalls on snowy streets, moonlighting to supplement exiguous incomes.
  • * 2001 — Terence Brown, The Life of W. B. Yeats: A Critical Biography .
  • Among the pressures provoking these distresses were a father's financial inadequacy and a growing awareness that, by finding employment himself, he could ameliorate the family's exiguous circumstances.
  • * 2012 — Rodger Cohen, Scottexalonia Rising, New York Times, Nov. 26., Op. Ed.
  • National politics, as President François Hollande of France is only the latest to discover, is often no more than tweaking at the margins in the exiguous political space left by markets and other global forces.

    Derived terms

    * exiguity * exiguously * exiguousness

    slight

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Small, weak or gentle; not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Slight is the subject, but not so the praise.
  • * (John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • Some firmly embrace doctrines upon slight grounds.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers), title=(A Cuckoo in the Nest)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Mother very rightly resented the slightest hint of condescension. She considered that the exclusiveness of Peter's circle was due not to its distinction, but to the fact that it was an inner Babylon of prodigality and whoredom,
  • Not stout or heavy; slender.
  • * Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • his own figure, which was formerly so slight
  • (obsolete) Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.
  • (Hudibras)

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * slightish * slightly * slightness

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To treat as slight or not worthy of attention, to make light of.
  • * Cowper
  • the wretch who slights the bounty of the skies
  • To treat with disdain or neglect.
  • To act negligently or carelessly.
  • (military, of a fortification) To render no longer defensible by full or partial demolition.
  • (Clarendon)
  • To make even or level.
  • (Hexham)
  • To throw heedlessly.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The rogue slighted me into the river.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * slightingly

    Noun

    (wikipedia slight) (en noun)
  • The act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy.
  • * (Benjamin Franklin)
  • Never use a slighting expression to her, even in jest; for slights in jest, after frequent bandyings, are apt to end in angry earnest.
  • Sleight.
  • (Spenser)

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * put a slight upon

    References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * lights