Sleep vs Kip - What's the difference?

sleep | kip |


As nouns the difference between sleep and kip

is that sleep is (uncountable) the state of reduced consciousness during which a human or animal rests in a daily rhythm while kip is the untanned of a young or small beast, such as a calf, lamb, or young goat or kip can be (informal|chiefly uk) a place to sleep; a rooming house; a bed or kip can be a unit of force equal to 1000 pounds-force (lbf) (444822 kilonewtons or 444822 newtons); occasionally called the kilopound or kip can be the unit of currency in laos, divided into 100 att, symbol , abbreviation lak or kip can be (gymnastics) a basic skill or maneuver in used, for example, as a way of mounting the bar in a front support position, or achieving a handstand from a hanging position in its basic form, the legs are swung forward and upward by bending the hips, then suddenly down again, which gives the upward impulse to the body.

As verbs the difference between sleep and kip

is that sleep is to rest in a state of reduced consciousness while kip is (informal|chiefly uk) to sleep; often with the connotation of a temporary or charitable situation, or one borne out of necessity.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

sleep

English

(wikipedia sleep)

Noun

  • (uncountable) The state of reduced consciousness during which a human or animal rests in a daily rhythm.
  • I really need some sleep .
    We need to conduct an overnight sleep''' test to diagnose your '''sleep problem.
  • (countable, informal) An act or instance of sleeping.
  • I’m just going to have a quick sleep .
  • (uncountable) Rheum found in the corner of the eyes after waking, whether real or a figurative objectification of sleep (in the sense of reduced consciousness ).
  • Wipe the sleep from your eyes .
  • A state of plants, usually at night, when their leaflets approach each other and the flowers close and droop, or are covered by the folded leaves.
  • * 1843 , Joh Müller, ?John Bell, Elements of Physiology (page 808)
  • The daily sleep of plants, and their winter sleep, present in this respect exactly similar phenomena

    Synonyms

    * See also * (rheum) (l) (slang), (l) (UK dialectal), sleepy dust (informal)

    Derived terms

    (Terms derived from the noun "sleep") * asleep * beauty sleep * big sleep * biphasic sleep * dead sleep * deep sleep * divided sleep * dog sleep * electrosleep * go to sleep * morning sleep * orthodox sleep * polyphasic sleep * put to sleep * REM sleep * segmented sleep * sleep apnea * sleep-charged * sleep debt * sleep deprivation * sleep disorder * sleepful * sleep-learning * sleepless * sleep mask * sleep mode * sleepover * sleep paralysis * sleep schedule * sleep spindle * sleeptalk * sleepy

    Verb

  • To rest in a state of reduced consciousness.
  • You should sleep 8 hours a day .
  • (Of a spinning top) to spin on its axis with no other perceptible motion.
  • * 1854 , Anne E. Baker, Glossary of Northamptonshire Words and Phrases
  • A top sleeps when it moves with such velocity, and spins so smoothly, that its motion is imperceptible.
    When a top is sleeping , it is spinning but not precessing.
  • To accommodate in beds.
  • This caravan can sleep up to four people .
  • To be slumbering in (a state).
  • to sleep a dreamless sleep
    (Tennyson)
  • To be careless, inattentive, or unconcerned; not to be vigilant; to live thoughtlessly.
  • * Atterbury
  • We sleep over our happiness.
  • To be dead; to lie in the grave.
  • * Bible, 1 Thessalonians iv. 14
  • Them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.
  • To be, or appear to be, in repose; to be quiet; to be unemployed, unused, or unagitated; to rest; to lie dormant.
  • a question sleeps''' for the present; the law '''sleeps
  • * Shakespeare
  • How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
  • (lb) to wait for a period of time without performing any action
  • Derived terms

    (Terms derived from the verb "sleep") * besleep * how can you sleep at night * forsleep * outsleep * oversleep * sleep around * sleep-at-noon * sleep in * sleep it off * sleep it out * sleep like a baby * sleep like a log * sleep off * sleep on * sleep out * sleep over * sleep together * sleep with * sleep with the fishes * Sleeping Beauty * sleeping bag * sleeping pill * sleepwalk

    Troponyms

    * (rest in a state of reduced consciousness) nap, doze, snooze

    See also

    * catnap * rest * shuteye * sleeping * slumber * snooze * zzz

    References

    *

    Statistics

    *

    kip

    English

    Etymology 1

    1325–75, (etyl) kipp, from (etyl) kip, from (etyl)

    Alternative forms

    * kipp, kippe, kyppe

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The untanned of a young or small beast, such as a calf, lamb, or young goat.
  • A bundle or set of such hides.
  • (obsolete) A unit of count for skins, 30 for lamb and 50 for goat.
  • The leather made from such hide; kip leather .
  • Etymology 2

    1760–70, probably related to (etyl) . From the same distant Germanic root as (cove).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (informal, chiefly UK) A place to sleep; a rooming house; a bed.
  • (informal, chiefly UK) Sleep, snooze, nap, forty winks, doze.
  • I’m just going for my afternoon kip .
  • (informal, chiefly UK) A very untidy house or room.
  • (informal, chiefly UK, dated) A brothel.
  • Verb

    (kipp)
  • (informal, chiefly UK) To sleep; often with the connotation of a temporary or charitable situation, or one borne out of necessity.
  • Don’t worry, I’ll kip on the sofabed.
    Synonyms
    * crash (US)

    Etymology 3

    1910–15, Americanism, abbreviated from (kilo) + (pound).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A unit of force equal to 1000 pounds-force (lbf) (4.44822 kilonewtons or 4448.22 newtons); occasionally called the kilopound.
  • A unit of weight, used, for example, to calculate shipping charges, equal to half a US ton, or 1000 pounds.
  • (rare, nonstandard) A unit of mass equal to 1000 avoirdupois pounds.
  • Etymology 4

    1950–55, from (etyl) . (Lao kip)

    Noun

    (kip)
  • The unit of currency in Laos, divided into 100 att, symbol , abbreviation LAK.
  • (-)

    Etymology 5

    Unknown. Some senses maybe related to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (gymnastics) A basic skill or maneuver in used, for example, as a way of mounting the bar in a front support position, or achieving a handstand from a hanging position. In its basic form, the legs are swung forward and upward by bending the hips, then suddenly down again, which gives the upward impulse to the body.
  • (Australia, games, two-up) A piece of flat wood used to throw the coins in a game of two-up.
  • * 1951 , , 1952, page 208,
  • Again Turk placed the pennies on the kip'. He took his time, deliberate over the small action, held the ' kip for a long breathless moment, then jerked his wrist and the pennies were in the air.
  • * 2003 , Gilbert Buchanan, Malco Polia - Traveller, Warrior , page 52,
  • Money was laid on the floor for bets on the heads'' or ''tails'' finish of two pennies tossed high into the air from a small wooden ''kip .
  • * 2010 , Colin McLaren, Sunflower: A Tale of Love, War and Intrigue , page 101,
  • Jack discarded a length of wood, two twists of wire, his two-up kip and a spanner.
  • A sharp-pointed hill; a projecting point, as on a hill.
  • Derived terms
    * kip-up

    Anagrams

    * * ----