Dialect vs Slangs - What's the difference?

dialect | slangs |


As a noun dialect

is (linguistics) a variety of a language (specifically, often a spoken variety) that is characteristic of a particular area, community or group, often with relatively minor differences in vocabulary, style, spelling and pronunciation.

As a verb slangs is

.

dialect

Noun

(en noun)
  • (linguistics) A variety of a language (specifically, often a spoken variety) that is characteristic of a particular area, community or group, often with relatively minor differences in vocabulary, style, spelling and pronunciation.
  • * A language is a dialect with an army and a navy.
  • *
  • And in addition, many dialects of English make no morphological distinction between Adjectives and Adverbs, and thus use Adjectives in contexts where the standard language requires -ly'' Adverbs: compare
    (81) (a)      Tex talks ''really quickly'' [Adverb + Adverb]
            (b)   %Tex talks ''real quick
    [Adjective + Adjective]
  • A dialect of a language perceived as substandard and wrong.
  • * 1967 , Roger W. Shuy, Discovering American dialects , National Council of Teachers of English, page 1:
  • Many even deny it and say something like this: "No, we don't speak a dialect around here. [...]
  • * 1975 , Linguistic perspectives on black English , H. Carl, page 219:
  • Well, those children don't speak dialect , not in this school. Maybe in the public schools, but not here.
  • * 1994 , H. Nigel Thomas, Spirits in the dark , Heinemann, page 11:
  • [...] on the second day, Miss Anderson gave the school a lecture on why it was wrong to speak dialect'. She had ended by saying "Respectable people don't speak ' dialect ."
  • A language.
  • A variant of a non-standardized programming language.
  • Home computers in the 1980s had many incompatible dialects of BASIC.

    Usage notes

    * The difference between a language and a dialect is not always clear, but it is generally considered that people who speak different dialects can understand each other, while people who speak different languages cannot. Compare species in the biological sense.

    Derived terms

    * dialectal * dialectic

    See also

    * dialogue * ethnolect * idiolect * sociolect

    Anagrams

    * ----

    slangs

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (slang)
  • ----

    slang

    English

    (wikipedia slang)

    Etymology 1

    1756, .

    Noun

  • Language outside of conventional usage.
  • Language that is unique to a particular profession or subject; jargon.
  • The specialized language of a social group, sometimes used to make what is said unintelligible to those not members of the group; cant.
  • *
  • "Oh, there are so many superior teas and sugars now. Superior is getting to be shopkeepers' slang ."
    "Are you beginning to dislike slang , then?" said Rosamond, with mild gravity.
    "Only the wrong sort. All choice of words is slang . It marks a class."
    "There is correct English: that is not slang ."
    "I beg your pardon: correct English is the slang' of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest '''slang''' of all is the ' slang of poets."
    Synonyms
    * (jargon) vernacular, jargon, lingo, dialect, cant

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (dated) To vocally abuse, or shout at.
  • * 1888', Also, he had to keep his temper when he was '''slanged in the theatre porch by a policeman — Rudyard Kipling, ‘Miss Youghal's ''Sais''’, ''Plain Tales from the Hills (Folio Society 2007, p. 26)
  • See also
    *

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (sling)
  • * 1836 , Edward Bagnall, Saul and David
  • Before he slang the all-deciding stone

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, dialect) Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.
  • (Holland)

    Etymology 4

    Compare sling.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, obsolete) A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.
  • Anagrams

    * * ----