Lax vs Slacken - What's the difference?

lax | slacken |


As a verb slacken is

to gradually decrease in intensity or tautness; to become slack.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

lax

English

Alternative forms

* (Killian)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) lax, from (etyl) .

Noun

(laxes)
  • A salmon.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • lenient and allowing for deviation; not strict.
  • The rules are fairly lax , but you have to know which ones you can bend.
  • * J. A. Symonds
  • Society at that epoch was lenient, if not lax , in matters of the passions.
  • loose; not tight or taut.
  • The rope fell lax .
  • * Ray
  • the flesh of that sort of fish being lax and spongy
  • lacking care; neglectful, negligent
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 1 , author=Phil Dawkes , title=Sunderland 2 - 2 West Brom , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Prior to this match, Albion had only scored three league goals all season, but Wes Brown's lax marking allowed Morrison to head in their fourth from a Chris Brunt free-kick and then, a minute later, the initial squandering of possession and Michael Turner's lack of pace let Long run through to slot in another.}}
  • (archaic) Having a looseness of the bowels; diarrheal.
  • Synonyms
    * permissive, lenient * loose, slack
    Antonyms
    * strict * taut, tight

    Noun

    (-)
  • lacrosse
  • ----

    slacken

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To gradually decrease in intensity or tautness; to become slack.
  • The pace slackened .
  • * 1900 , , The House Behind the Cedars , Chapter I,
  • During this interlude, Warwick, though he had slackened his pace measurably, had so nearly closed the gap between himself and them as to hear the old woman say, with the dulcet negro intonation:...
  • * 1908 ,
  • He seemed tired, and the Rat let him rest unquestioned, understanding something of what was in his thoughts; knowing, too, the value all animals attach at times to mere silent companionship, when the weary muscles slacken and the mind marks time.
  • To make slack, less taut, or less intense.
  • * 1986 , Mari Sandoz, The Horsecatcher?
  • Elk slackened the rope so he could walk farther away, and together they went awkwardly up the trail toward the grassy little flat...
  • To deprive of cohesion by combining chemically with water; to slake.
  • to slack lime

    Anagrams

    *