Stive vs Skive - What's the difference?

stive | skive |


As nouns the difference between stive and skive

is that stive is (obsolete) a stew while skive is the iron lap used by diamond polishers in finishing the facets of the gem.

As verbs the difference between stive and skive

is that stive is to be stifled or suffocated while skive is to pare or shave off the rough or thick parts of (hides or leather).

stive

English

Noun

  • (obsolete) A stew.
  • The floating dust in a flour mill caused by the operation of grinding.
  • (De Colange)
  • * 1867 , The British Farmer's Magazine , Volum LII, New Series, page 231,
  • The removal of the heated air, steam, stive , and flour from the millstones, is a proposition which does not appear to be more than sufficiently well understood.

    Derived terms

    * stive-box, stive-room

    Verb

    (stiv)
  • To be stifled or suffocated.
  • To compress, to cram; to make close and hot; to render stifling.
  • * Sir H. Wotton
  • His chamber was commonly stived with friends or suitors of one kind or other.
  • * 1796 , Amelia Simmons, , 1996 Bicentennial Facsimile Edition, page 64,
  • Let your cucumbers be ?mall, fre?h gathered, and free from ?pots; then make a pickle of ?alt and water, ?trong enough to bear an egg; boil the pickle and ?kim it well, and then pour it upon your cucumbers, and ?tive them down for twenty four hours;.
  • * 1836 , T. S. Davis (editor), Kitchen Poetry'', ''Every Body's Album , Volume 1, page 172,
  • And here I mist stay, / In this stived up kitchen to work all day.
  • * 1851 , , Margaret: A Tale of the Real and Ideal, Blight and Bloom , 1871, page 284,
  • "Things are a good deal stived up," answered the Deacon.
    ----

    skive

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The iron lap used by diamond polishers in finishing the facets of the gem.
  • * 2009 , Nicoline van der Sijs, Cookies, Coleslaw, and Stoops: The Influence of Dutch on the North American Languages , page 93
  • Thus, American diamond cutters would talk of a skive (after Dutch schijf ), where their British colleagues would say disk or wheel.

    Verb

    (skiv)
  • To pare or shave off the rough or thick parts of (hides or leather).
  • (British) To avoid one's lessons or, sometimes, work. Chiefly at school or university.
  • * 2006 , The Economist, Young offenders: Arrested development
  • Truancies, rather bewilderingly, have risen among children on the programme; the government hopes this is because children skive more as they get older.

    Derived terms

    * skiver

    Noun

  • a disc (UK) or disk (US)
  • a washer (small disc with a hole in the middle )
  • a slice (e.g. slice of bread )
  • Derived terms

    * * (l) ----