Shive vs Skive - What's the difference?

shive | skive |


As nouns the difference between shive and skive

is that shive is a slice, especially of bread or shive can be (obsolete) a splinter; a particle of fluff on the surface of cloth or other material or shive can be or shive can be while skive is the iron lap used by diamond polishers in finishing the facets of the gem.

As a verb skive is

to pare or shave off the rough or thick parts of (hides or leather).

shive

English

Etymology 1

(wikipedia shive) A parallel form of (sheave), from a (etyl) base which probably existed in (etyl) (though is not attested before the Middle English period). Cognate with (etyl) Scheibe, late (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A slice, especially of bread.
  • * 1980 , Anthony Burgess, Earthly Powers :
  • In my cool room with the shutters shut and the thin shives of air and light coming through the slats, I cried myself to sleep in an overloud selfpitying transport.
  • (obsolete) A sheave.
  • A beam or plank of split wood.
  • A flat, wide cork for plugging a large hole.
  • Etymology 2

    From a (etyl) base which probably existed in Old English (though is not attested before the Middle English period). Cognate with (etyl) Schebe, (etyl) scheef.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A splinter; a particle of fluff on the surface of cloth or other material.
  • (paper-makin) A particle of impurity in finished paper.
  • Etymology 3

    Variant of shiv.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 2006 , Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day (Vintage 2007), page 50:
  • So every alleyway down here, every shadow big enough to hide a shive artist with a grudge, is a warm invitation to rewrite history.

    Etymology 4

    See shiva

    Noun

  • * 2010 , , A Life of Learning
  • There are some cultural details in Schissel’s story that are specific to the Jewish community: the family sits shive (seven days of mourning for the dead), and the preference for silence at that time.
    Derived terms
    * sit shive

    Anagrams

    *

    skive

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The iron lap used by diamond polishers in finishing the facets of the gem.
  • * 2009 , Nicoline van der Sijs, Cookies, Coleslaw, and Stoops: The Influence of Dutch on the North American Languages , page 93
  • Thus, American diamond cutters would talk of a skive (after Dutch schijf ), where their British colleagues would say disk or wheel.

    Verb

    (skiv)
  • To pare or shave off the rough or thick parts of (hides or leather).
  • (British) To avoid one's lessons or, sometimes, work. Chiefly at school or university.
  • * 2006 , The Economist, Young offenders: Arrested development
  • Truancies, rather bewilderingly, have risen among children on the programme; the government hopes this is because children skive more as they get older.

    Derived terms

    * skiver

    Noun

  • a disc (UK) or disk (US)
  • a washer (small disc with a hole in the middle )
  • a slice (e.g. slice of bread )
  • Derived terms

    * * (l) ----