Skip vs Tip - What's the difference?

skip | tip |


In context|music|lang=en terms the difference between skip and tip

is that skip is (music) a passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once while tip is (music) the end of a bow of a stringed instrument that is not held.

As verbs the difference between skip and tip

is that skip is to move by hopping on alternate feet while tip is to provide with a tip; to cover the tip of or tip can be to knock over; to make fall down, to overturn or tip can be or tip can be to give a small gratuity to, especially to an employee of someone who provides a service or tip can be to give a piece of private information to; to inform (someone) of a clue, secret knowledge, etc.

As nouns the difference between skip and tip

is that skip is a leaping, jumping or skipping movement or skip can be (australia|new zealand|british) a large open-topped rubbish bin, designed to be lifted onto the back of a truck to take away both bin and contents; called a dumpster in north america (where "skip" is completely unknown and incomprehensible) see also skep or skip can be short for skipper, the master or captain of a ship, or other person in authority or skip can be (australia|slang) an australian of anglo-celtic descent while tip is the extreme end of something, especially when pointed; eg the sharp end of a pencil or tip can be (skittles|obsolete) the knocking over of a skittle or tip can be or tip can be a gratuity; a small amount of money left for a bartender, waiter, taxi driver or other servant as a token of appreciation or tip can be a piece of private or secret information, especially imparted by someone with expert knowledge about sporting odds, business performance etc or tip can be (aave) a kick or phase; one's current habits or behaviour.

skip

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), of (etyl) origin, ultimately from (etyl) .

Verb

(skipp)
  • To move by hopping on alternate feet.
  • She will skip from one end of the sidewalk to the other.
  • To leap about lightly.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, / Had he thy reason, would he skip and play?
  • * Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • So she drew her mother away skipping , dancing, and frisking fantastically.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 29 , author=Ian Hughes , title=Southampton 1 - 2 Man Utd , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The hosts maintained their discipline and shape, even threatening to grab a second goal on the break - left-back Dan Harding made a scintillating run, skipping past a few challenges before prodding a right-footed shot that did not match his build-up.}}
  • To skim, ricochet or bounce over a surface.
  • The rock will skip across the pond.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Chris Whyatt , title=Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=After Essien's poor attempt flew into the stands, Rodrigo Moreno - Bolton's on-loan winger from Benfica who was making his full Premier League debut - nearly exposed the Blues with a lovely ball for Johan Elmander, but it just skipped away from his team-mate's toes.}}
  • To throw (something), making it skim, ricochet, or bounce over a surface.
  • I bet I can skip this rock to the other side of the pond.
  • To disregard, miss or omit part of a continuation (some item or stage).
  • My heart will skip a beat.
    I will read most of the book, but skip the first chapter because the video covered it.
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • They who have a mind to see the issue may skip these two chapters.
  • To place an item in a skip.
  • (informal) Not to attend (some event, especially a class or a meeting).
  • Yeah, I really should go to the quarterly meeting but I think I'm going to skip it.
  • (informal) To leave; as, to skip town, to skip the country.
  • * 1998 ,
  • I see ya' little speed boat head up our coast
    She really want to ''skip town
    Get back off me, beast off me
    Get back you flea infested mongrel
  • To leap lightly over.
  • to skip the rope
  • To jump rope.
  • The girls were skipping in the playground.
    Synonyms
    * (sense) (US) play hookie

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A leaping, jumping or skipping movement.
  • The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.
  • (music) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.
  • (Busby)
  • A person who attempts to disappear so as not to be found.
  • * 2012 , Susan Nash, Skip Tracing Basics and Beyond (page 19)
  • Tracking down debtors is a big part of a skip tracer's job. That's the case because deadbeats who haven't paid their bills and have disappeared are the most common type of skips .

    Derived terms

    * skipping rope

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (Australia, New Zealand, British) A large open-topped rubbish bin, designed to be lifted onto the back of a truck to take away both bin and contents; called a dumpster in North America (where "skip" is completely unknown and incomprehensible). See also skep.
  • (mining) A transportation container in a mine, usually for ore or mullock.
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) A skep, or basket.
  • A wheeled basket used in cotton factories.
  • (sugar manufacture) A charge of syrup in the pans.
  • A beehive.
  • Synonyms
    * (open-topped rubbish bin) dumpster

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • Short for skipper, the master or captain of a ship, or other person in authority.
  • (curling) The player who calls the shots and traditionally throws the last two rocks.
  • Etymology 4

    A reference to the television series ; coined and used by Australians (particularly children) of non-British descent to counter derogatory terms aimed at them. Australian National Dictionary Centre » Home » Australian words » Meanings and origins of Australian words and idioms » S

    Alternative forms

    * skippy

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (Australia, slang) An Australian of Anglo-Celtic descent.
  • * 2001 , ), Effie: Just Quietly'' (TV series), Episode: ''Nearest and Dearest ,
  • Effie: How did you find the second, the defacto, and what nationality is she?
    Barber: She is Australian.
    Effie: Is she? Gone for a skip . You little radical you.
    See also
    * limey * wog

    References

    tip

    English

    Etymology 1

    Circa 1225. Not recorded in Old English or Old Norse, but apparently cognate with Dutch tip, East Frisian tip, Danish tip, Swedish tipp. Perhaps cognate with Old English . Compare Albanian .

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • The extreme end of something, especially when pointed; e.g. the sharp end of a pencil.
  • * 1848 , (Anne Bronte), The Tenant of Wildfell Hall :
  • When he woke up, about half an hour after, he called it to him again, but Dash only looked sheepish and wagged the tip of his tail.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=52, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The new masters and commanders , passage=From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much.
  • A piece of metal, fabric or other material used to cover the top of something for protection, utility or decoration.
  • (music) The end of a bow of a stringed instrument that is not held.
  • A piece of stiffened lining pasted on the inside of a hat crown.
  • A thin, boarded brush made of camel's hair, used by gilders in lifting gold leaf.
  • Rubbish thrown from a quarry.
  • (Webster 1913)
    Synonyms
    *(extreme end of something) extremity

    Verb

    (tipp)
  • To provide with a tip; to cover the tip of.
  • * 1598 , William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing , Act V:
  • I thinke he thinkes vpon the sauage bull: / Tush, feare not man, wee'll tip thy hornes with gold, / And all Europa shall reioyce at thee [...].
  • * Hudibras
  • truncheon tipped with iron head
  • * Thomson
  • Tipped with jet, / Fair ermines spotless as the snows they press.

    Etymology 2

    Possibly from Scandinavian, or a special use of Etymology 1.

    Verb

    (tipp)
  • To knock over; to make fall down, to overturn.
  • To fall over.
  • To be, or come to be, in a tilted or sloping position; to become unbalanced.
  • * 1851 , Herman Melville, Moby-Dick :
  • the brief suspended agony of the boat, as it would tip for an instant on the knife-like edge of the sharper waves, that almost seemed threatening to cut it in two [...].
  • (transitive, slang, dated) To drink.
  • To dump (refuse).
  • (US) To pour a libation, particularly from a forty of malt liquor.
  • * 1993 , ”:
  • I tip my 40 to your memory.
  • To deflect with one?s fingers, especially one?s fingertips
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 28 , author=Jon Smith , title=Valencia 1 - 1 Chelsea , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Lampard was replaced by Kalou but the substitute immediately gave the ball to Jonas, whose 25-yard curler was tipped wide by Cech.}}
    Derived terms
    * tip off * tip one's hand * tip one's hat * tippable

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (skittles, obsolete) The knocking over of a skittle.
  • An act of tipping up or tilting.
  • (UK, Australia, New Zealand) An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish or refuse, as from a mine; a heap (see tipple ); a dump.
  • * 1972 May 18, Jon Tinker, Must we waste rubbish?'', '' , page 389,
  • As the tip slowly squashes under its own weight, bacteria rot away the organic matter, mainly anaerobically with the generation of methane.
  • * 2009 , Donna Kelly, 'Don't dump on Hepburn's top tip'], [http://www.hepburnadvocate.com.au/, The Hepburn Advocate, Fairfax Digital
  • When I was a kid I used to love going to the tip .
  • * 2009 , Rother District Council, Rother District Council Website
  • There are two rubbish tip s in Rother.
  • * 2009 , Beck Vass, 'Computer collectibles saved from the tip' The New Zealand Herald, Technology section, APN Holdings NZ Ltd
  • Computer collectibles saved from the tip
  • (UK, Australia, New Zealand, by extension) A recycling centre.
  • (colloquial) A very untidy place.
  • The act of deflecting with one's fingers, especially the fingertips
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 1 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Everton 0 - 2 Liverpool , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=As a frenetic opening continued, Cahill - whose robust approach had already prompted Jamie Carragher to register his displeasure to Atkinson - rose above the Liverpool defence to force keeper Pepe Reina into an athletic tip over the top.}}

    Etymology 3

    Of uncertain origin; apparently cognate with (etyl) tippen, (etyl) tippen, (etyl) tippa.

    Verb

    (tipp)
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • A third rogue tips me by the elbow.

    Noun

    (tips)
  • Etymology 4

    Originally thieves' slang, of uncertain orign.

    Verb

    (tipp)
  • To give a small gratuity to, especially to an employee of someone who provides a service.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers), title=(A Cuckoo in the Nest)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Mother
  • Derived terms
    * tipper * tipping

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A gratuity; a small amount of money left for a bartender, waiter, taxi driver or other servant as a token of appreciation.
  • * 1897 , Bram Stoker, Dracula :
  • A half crown tip put the deputy's knowledge at my disposal, and I learned that Mr. Bloxam [...] had left for his work at five o'clock that morning.
    Synonyms
    * cumshaw * baksheesh

    Etymology 5

    Probably from , or a combination of the two.

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A piece of private or secret information, especially imparted by someone with expert knowledge about sporting odds, business performance etc.
  • A piece of advice.
  • Derived terms
    * hot tip * stock tip * tip-off (rel-mid) * tip sheet * tipster (rel-bottom)
    Descendants
    * German: (l)

    Verb

    (tipp)
  • To give a piece of private information to; to inform (someone) of a clue, secret knowledge, etc.
  • Derived terms
    * tip off

    Etymology 6

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (AAVE) A kick or phase; one's current habits or behaviour.
  • (AAVE) A particular arena or sphere of interest; a front.
  • References

    * (seeCites)

    Anagrams

    * * ----