Stride vs Skip - What's the difference?

stride | skip |


As verbs the difference between stride and skip

is that stride is while skip is to move by hopping on alternate feet.

As a noun skip is

a leaping, jumping or skipping movement or skip can be (australia|new zealand|british) a large open-topped rubbish bin, designed to be lifted onto the back of a truck to take away both bin and contents; called a dumpster in north america (where "skip" is completely unknown and incomprehensible) see also skep or skip can be short for skipper, the master or captain of a ship, or other person in authority or skip can be (australia|slang) an australian of anglo-celtic descent.

stride

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Verb

  • To walk with long steps.
  • * Dryden
  • Mars in the middle of the shining shield / Is graved, and strides along the liquid field.
  • To stand with the legs wide apart; to straddle.
  • To pass over at a step; to step over.
  • * Shakespeare
  • a debtor that not dares to stride a limit
  • To straddle; to bestride.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I mean to stride your steed.
    Usage notes
    * The past participle of (term) is extremely rare and mostly obsolete. Many people have trouble producing a form that feels natural. Language Log][http://www.languagehat.com/archives/003282.php Language Hat

    Etymology 2

    See the above verb.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A long step.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=7 citation , passage=Still, a dozen men with rifles, and cartridges to match, stayed behind when they filed through a white aldea lying silent amid the cane, and the Sin Verguenza swung into slightly quicker stride .}}
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=November 10 , author=Jeremy Wilson , title= England Under 21 5 Iceland Under 21 0: match report , work=Telegraph citation , page= , passage=An utterly emphatic 5-0 victory was ultimately capped by two wonder strikes in the last two minutes from Aston Villa midfielder Gary Gardner. Before that, England had utterly dominated to take another purposeful stride towards the 2013 European Championship in Israel. They have already established a five-point buffer at the top of Group Eight. }}
  • (computing) The number of memory locations between successive elements in an array, pixels in a bitmap, etc.
  • * 2007 , Andy Oram, Greg Wilson, Beautiful code
  • This stride value is generally equal to the pixel width of the bitmap times the number of bytes per pixel, but for performance reasons it might be rounded
  • A jazz piano style of the 1920s and 1930s. The left hand characteristically plays a four-beat pulse with a single bass note, octave, seventh or tenth interval on the first and third beats, and a chord on the second and fourth beats.
  • Derived terms
    * bestride * * take something in stride * get into one's stride * strides (qualifier)

    Anagrams

    * * * *

    References

    English irregular verbs ----

    skip

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), of (etyl) origin, ultimately from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (skipp)
  • To move by hopping on alternate feet.
  • She will skip from one end of the sidewalk to the other.
  • To leap about lightly.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, / Had he thy reason, would he skip and play?
  • * Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • So she drew her mother away skipping , dancing, and frisking fantastically.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 29 , author=Ian Hughes , title=Southampton 1 - 2 Man Utd , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The hosts maintained their discipline and shape, even threatening to grab a second goal on the break - left-back Dan Harding made a scintillating run, skipping past a few challenges before prodding a right-footed shot that did not match his build-up.}}
  • To skim, ricochet or bounce over a surface.
  • The rock will skip across the pond.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Chris Whyatt , title=Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=After Essien's poor attempt flew into the stands, Rodrigo Moreno - Bolton's on-loan winger from Benfica who was making his full Premier League debut - nearly exposed the Blues with a lovely ball for Johan Elmander, but it just skipped away from his team-mate's toes.}}
  • To throw (something), making it skim, ricochet, or bounce over a surface.
  • I bet I can skip this rock to the other side of the pond.
  • To disregard, miss or omit part of a continuation (some item or stage).
  • My heart will skip a beat.
    I will read most of the book, but skip the first chapter because the video covered it.
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • They who have a mind to see the issue may skip these two chapters.
  • To place an item in a skip.
  • (informal) Not to attend (some event, especially a class or a meeting).
  • Yeah, I really should go to the quarterly meeting but I think I'm going to skip it.
  • (informal) To leave; as, to skip town, to skip the country.
  • * 1998 ,
  • I see ya' little speed boat head up our coast
    She really want to ''skip town
    Get back off me, beast off me
    Get back you flea infested mongrel
  • To leap lightly over.
  • to skip the rope
  • To jump rope.
  • The girls were skipping in the playground.
    Synonyms
    * (sense) (US) play hookie

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A leaping, jumping or skipping movement.
  • The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.
  • (music) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.
  • (Busby)
  • A person who attempts to disappear so as not to be found.
  • * 2012 , Susan Nash, Skip Tracing Basics and Beyond (page 19)
  • Tracking down debtors is a big part of a skip tracer's job. That's the case because deadbeats who haven't paid their bills and have disappeared are the most common type of skips .

    Derived terms

    * skipping rope

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australia, New Zealand, British) A large open-topped rubbish bin, designed to be lifted onto the back of a truck to take away both bin and contents; called a dumpster in North America (where "skip" is completely unknown and incomprehensible). See also skep.
  • (mining) A transportation container in a mine, usually for ore or mullock.
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) A skep, or basket.
  • A wheeled basket used in cotton factories.
  • (sugar manufacture) A charge of syrup in the pans.
  • A beehive.
  • Synonyms
    * (open-topped rubbish bin) dumpster

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Short for skipper, the master or captain of a ship, or other person in authority.
  • (curling) The player who calls the shots and traditionally throws the last two rocks.
  • Etymology 4

    A reference to the television series ; coined and used by Australians (particularly children) of non-British descent to counter derogatory terms aimed at them. Australian National Dictionary Centre » Home » Australian words » Meanings and origins of Australian words and idioms » S

    Alternative forms

    * skippy

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australia, slang) An Australian of Anglo-Celtic descent.
  • * 2001 , ), Effie: Just Quietly'' (TV series), Episode: ''Nearest and Dearest ,
  • Effie: How did you find the second, the defacto, and what nationality is she?
    Barber: She is Australian.
    Effie: Is she? Gone for a skip . You little radical you.
    See also
    * limey * wog

    References