Skin vs Patch - What's the difference?

skin | patch |


As nouns the difference between skin and patch

is that skin is (uncountable) the outer protective layer of the body of any animal, including of a human while patch is a piece of cloth, or other suitable material, sewed or otherwise fixed upon a garment to repair or strengthen it, especially upon an old garment to cover a hole or patch can be (archaic) a paltry fellow; a rogue; a ninny; a fool.

As verbs the difference between skin and patch

is that skin is to injure the skin of while patch is to mend by sewing on a piece or pieces of cloth, leather, or the like; as, to patch a coat.

skin

English

(wikipedia skin)

Noun

  • (uncountable) The outer protective layer of the body of any animal, including of a human.
  • He is so disgusting he makes my skin crawl.
  • (uncountable) The outer protective layer of the fruit of a plant.
  • (countable) The skin and fur of an individual animal used by humans for clothing, upholstery, etc.
  • (countable) A congealed layer on the surface of a liquid.
  • In order to get to the rest of the paint in the can, you?ll have to remove the skin floating on top of it.
  • (countable, computing) A set of resources that modifies the appearance and/or layout of the graphical user interface of a computer program.
  • You can use this skin to change how the browser looks.
  • (countable, slang) Rolling paper for cigarettes.
  • Pass me a skin , mate.
  • (countable, slang)
  • (Australia) A subgroup of Australian aboriginal people; such divisions are cultural and not related to an individual?s physical skin''. 1994 , ''Macquarie Aboriginal Words , , paperback ISBN 0-949757-79-9, Introduction.
  • (countable, video games) An alternate appearance (texture map or geometry) for a 3D character model in a video game.
  • (slang) Bare flesh, particularly bare breasts.
  • Let me see a bit of skin .
  • A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids.
  • * Tennyson
  • skins of wine
  • (nautical) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole.
  • (Totten)
  • (nautical) The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing.
  • Synonyms

    * (outer covering of living tissue) dermis, integument, tegument * (outer protective layer of a plant or animal) peel (of fruit or vegetable), pericarp * (skin of an animal used by humans) hide, pelt * (congealed layer on the surface of a liquid) film * (subgroup of Australian Aboriginals) moiety, section, subsection

    Derived terms

    * banana skin * buckskin * by the skin of one's teeth * calfskin * cleanskin * comfortable in one's own skin * deerskin * doeskin * get under someone's skin * give some skin to * goatskin * goose skin * it's no skin off my back * jump in one's skin * lambskin * loinskin * make one's skin crawl * moleskin * no skin off my nose * pigskin * sealskin * second skin * sharkskin * sheepskin * shirts and skins * skin and bone, skin and bones * skin cancer * skin care, skincare * skin cell * skin cream * skin-deep * skin disease * skin effect * skin flick * skinflint * skin flute * skinfold * skinful * skin graft * skinhead * skin in the game * skinless * skin movie * skin type * snakeskin * waterskin * wineskin

    See also

    * cutaneous * cutis * dermis * epidermis

    Verb

    (skinn)
  • To injure the skin of.
  • He fell off his bike and skinned his knee on the concrete.
  • To remove the skin and/or fur of an animal or a human.
  • (colloquial) To high five.
  • (transitive, computing, colloquial) To apply a skin to (a computer program).
  • Can I skin the application to put the picture of my cat on it?
  • (UK, soccer, transitive) To use tricks to go past a defender.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 30 , author=Kevin Darlng , title=Arsenal 2 - 1 Huddersfield , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The Russian, sometimes out of sorts in recent weeks, was seeing plenty of the ball on the left-hand side up against Hunt, a 20-year-old right-back making his first Huddersfield start. Arshavin skinned the youngster at the first opportunity and crossed for Bendtner, who could not direct his close-range effort on target.}}
  • To become covered with skin.
  • A wound eventually skins over.
  • To cover with skin, or as if with skin; hence, to cover superficially.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It will but skin and film the ulcerous place.
  • (US, slang, archaic) To produce, in recitation, examination, etc., the work of another for one's own, or to use cribs, memoranda, etc., which are prohibited.
  • (slang, dated) To strip of money or property; to cheat.
  • Synonyms

    * (injure the skin of) bark, chafe, excoriate, graze, scrape * (remove the skin of) flay, fleece, flense, scalp

    Derived terms

    * skinnable * skinner * skin up * there's more than one way to skin a cat * thin-skinned * thick-skinned * tough-skinned

    Anagrams

    * inks, sink

    References

    1000 English basic words ----

    patch

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) patche, . Alternatively, perhaps a variant of (etyl) .

    Noun

    (es)
  • A piece of cloth, or other suitable material, sewed or otherwise fixed upon a garment to repair or strengthen it, especially upon an old garment to cover a hole.
  • His sleeves had patches on the elbows where different fabric had been sewn on to replace material that had worn away.
  • A small piece of anything used to repair damage or a breach; as, a patch on a kettle, a roof, etc.
  • I can't afford to replace the roof, which is what it really needs. I'll have the roofer apply a patch .
  • A repair intended to be used for a limited time; (differs from previous usage in that it is intended to be a temporary fix and the size of the repair is irrelevant).
    This usage can mean that the repair is temporary because it is an early but necessary step in the process of properly, completely repairing something,
  • Before you can fix a dam, you have to apply a patch to the hole so that everything can dry off.
    or that it is temporary because it is not meant to last long or will be removed as soon as a proper repair can be made, which will happen in the near future.
    "This patch should hold until you reach the city," the mechanic said as he patted the car's hood.
  • A small, usually contrasting but always somehow different or distinct, part of something else (location, time, size);
  • The world economy had a rough patch in the 1930s.
    The storms last summer washed away parts of the road so we can expect some rough patches up ahead.
    To me, a normal cow is white with black patches , but Sarah's from Texas and most of the cows there have solid brown, black, or red coats.
    Doesn't that patch of clouds looks like a bunny?
    I lost my locket in this patch of grass here.
    When ice skating, be sure to stay away from reeds, there's always thin patches of ice there and you could fall through.
    I never get first place because on track eight, right after you pass the windmill, there's a patch of oil in the road that always gets me.
  • A small piece of black silk stuck on the face or neck to heighten beauty; an imitation beauty mark.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • Your black patches you wear variously.
  • (medicine) A piece of material used to cover a wound.
  • (medicine) An adhesive piece of material, impregnated with a drug, which is worn on the skin; the drug being slowly absorbed over a period of time.
  • Many people use a nicotine patch to wean themselves off of nicotine.
  • (medicine) A cover worn over a damaged eye, an eyepatch.
  • He had scratched his cornea so badly that his doctor told him to wear a patch .
  • A block on the muzzle of a gun, to do away with the effect of dispart, in sighting.
  • (computing) A patch file, a file used for input to a patch program or that describes changes made to a computer file or files, usually changes made to a computer program that fix a programming bug.
  • A small piece of material that is manually passed through a gun barrel to clean it.
  • A piece of greased cloth or leather used as wrapping for a rifle ball, to make it fit the bore.
  • A cable connecting two pieces of electrical equipment.
  • A sound setting for a musical synthesizer (originally selected by means of a patch cable).
  • Synonyms
    * (piece of black silk) beauty spot * section, area, blotch, spot, period of time, spell, stretch * diff file
    Derived terms
    * cabbage patch * not a patch on * patch file * patch up * patchwork * patchy

    Verb

    (es)
  • To mend by sewing on a piece or pieces of cloth, leather, or the like; as, to patch a coat.
  • *, chapter=8
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=That concertina was a wonder in its way. The handles that was on it first was wore out long ago, and he'd made new ones of braided rope yarn. And the bellows was patched in more places than a cranberry picker's overalls.}}
  • To mend with pieces; to repair by fastening pieces on.
  • To make out of pieces or patches, like a quilt.
  • To join or unite the pieces of; to patch the skirt.
  • A temporary, removable electronic connection, as one between two components in a communications system.
  • * (rfdate) The Matrix Revolutions , Scene: Starting the Logos, 00:43:09 - 00:43:32
  • [the control panel of hovercraft'' The Logos ''has lit up after being jumped by'' The Hammer]
    Sparky: ''She lives again.''
    Crew member of The Hammer via radio: ''You want us to patch an uplink to reload the software, Sparky?''
    Sparky: ''Yeah, that'd be swell. And can you clean the windshield while you're at it?
  • To repair or arrange in a hasty or clumsy manner; – generally with up; as, to patch up a truce.
  • (computing) To make the changes a patch describes; to apply a patch to the files in question. Hence:
  • # To fix or improve a computer program without a complete upgrade.
  • # To make a quick and possibly temporary change to a program.
  • To connect two pieces of electrical equipment using a cable.
  • Synonyms
    * See also

    See also

    * diff * diff file

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (es)
  • (archaic) A paltry fellow; a rogue; a ninny; a fool.
  • * 1610 , , act 3 scene 2
  • What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch !

    Anagrams

    * ----