Ghost vs Skeleton - What's the difference?

ghost | skeleton |


In computing|lang=en terms the difference between ghost and skeleton

is that ghost is (computing) to copy a file or hard drive image while skeleton is (computing) a client-helper procedure that communicates with a stub.

As nouns the difference between ghost and skeleton

is that ghost is (rare) the spirit; the soul of man while skeleton is (anatomy) the system that provides support to an organism, internal and made up of bones and cartilage in vertebrates, external in some other animals.

As verbs the difference between ghost and skeleton

is that ghost is (obsolete|transitive) to haunt; to appear to in the form of an apparition while skeleton is (archaic) to reduce to a skeleton; to skin; to skeletonize.

ghost

English

Alternative forms

* ghoast (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (rare) The spirit; the soul of man.
  • * Spenser
  • Then gives her grieved ghost thus to lament.
  • The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a specter.
  • Everyone showed that the ghost of an old lady haunted this crypt.
  • *
  • The mighty ghosts of our great Harries rose.
  • * Coleridge
  • I thought that I had died in sleep/And was a blessed ghost .
  • *
  • Hepaticology, outside the temperate parts of the Northern Hemisphere, still lies deep in the shadow cast by that ultimate "closet taxonomist," Franz Stephani—a ghost whose shadow falls over us all.
  • Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a phantom; a glimmering.
  • * Poe
  • Each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= William E. Conner
  • , title= An Acoustic Arms Race , volume=101, issue=3, page=206-7, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.}}
  • A false image formed in a telescope, camera, or other optical device by reflection from the surfaces of one or more lenses.
  • An unwanted image similar to and overlapping or adjacent to the main one on a television screen, caused by the transmitted image being received both directly and via reflection.
  • A ghostwriter.
  • (Internet) An unresponsive user on IRC, resulting from the user's client disconnecting without notifying the server.
  • (computing) An image of a file or hard disk.
  • (theater) An understudy.
  • (espionage) A covert (and deniable) agent.
  • The faint image that remains after an attempt to remove graffiti.
  • * 1992 , Maurice J. Whitford, Getting Rid of Graffiti (page 45)
  • Regardless of GRM used, graffiti ghosts persist. Protect cladding with surface coating or replace with graffiti resistant paint or laminate.
  • (video games) An opponent in a racing game that follows a previously recorded route, allowing players to compete against previous best times.
  • * 2012 , Keith Burgun, Game Design Theory: A New Philosophy for Understanding Games
  • This is also the case for some racing games (Super Mario Kart is a good example) that allow you to compete against your ghosts , which are precise recordings of your performance.
  • (label)
  • (label) the of
  • (label) perceived or listed but not
  • (label) of nature
  • (label)
  • Synonyms

    * (soul) soul, spirit * (spirit appearing after death) apparition, haint, phantom, revenant, specter/spectre, spook, wraith. * (faint shadowy semblance) glimmer, glimmering, glimpse, hint, inkling, spark, suggestion. * (false image in an optical device) * (false image on a television screen) : echo * (ghostwriter) ghostwriter * See also

    Derived terms

    * antighost * * ghost band * ghost bat * ghost bike * ghost catshark * ghost chili * ghost condensate * ghost crab * ghost dance * ghost detainee * ghosten * Ghost Festival * ghost flathead * ghost fleet * ghost frog * ghost fungus * ghost goal * ghost gum * ghost hunting * ghost imaging * ghost insect * ghost island * ghost knifefish * ghost light * ghost mark * ghost moth * ghost net * ghost note * ghost of a chance * ghost orchid * ghostly * ghost pepper * ghost ramp * ghost-riding * ghost runner * ghost ship * ghost shrimp * ghost sickness * ghost sign * ghost skate * ghost slug * ghost station * ghost story * ghost town * ghost train * ghost voting * ghost world * ghostwriter * give up the ghost * grey ghost * Holy Ghost

    See also

    * apparition * banshee * barghest * bogeyman * boggart * bogie * channelling * chimera * demon * doppelganger * draugr * duppy * ectoplasm * eidolon * exorcism * fantom * fetch * ghoul * haint * hallucination * haunt * illusion * incubus * lamia * larva * lemur * manes * mare * medium * mirage * necromancy * nightmare * phantasm * phantom * poltergeist * revenant * shade * shadow * specter * spectre * spirit * Spiritism * spook * sprite * soul * things that go bump in the night * vampire * visitant * wendigo * wight * will-o'-the-wisp * wraith * zombie

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To haunt; to appear to in the form of an apparition.
  • * 1606 , , Act II, sc. 6, l. 1221
  • since Julius Caesar, / Who at Philippi the good Brutus ghosted
  • (obsolete) To die; to expire.
  • (Sir Philip Sidney)
  • (ambitransitive) To ghostwrite.
  • (nautical) To sail seemingly without wind.
  • (computing) To copy a file or hard drive image.
  • (GUI) To gray out (a visual item) to indicate that it is unavailable.
  • * 1991 , Amiga User Interface Style Guide (page 76)
  • Whenever a menu or menu item is inappropriate or unavailable for selection, it should be ghosted . Never allow the user to select something that does nothing in response.
  • (internet) To forcibly disconnect an IRC user who is using one's reserved nickname.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 24 , author=David Ornstein , title=Arsenal 3 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Arsenal came into the match under severe pressure and nerves were palpable early on as Pratley was brilliantly denied by Szczesny after ghosting in front of Kieran Gibbs}}

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l)

    skeleton

    English

    {{ picdic , image= Human skeleton front arrows no labels.svg , width=285 , height=300 , labels= , detail1=Click on labels in the image , detail2= }} (wikipedia skeleton)

    Alternative forms

    * sceleton

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (anatomy) The system that provides support to an organism, internal and made up of bones and cartilage in vertebrates, external in some other animals.
  • * 1883 , ,
  • At the foot of a pretty big pine, and involved in a green creeper, which had even partly lifted some of the smaller bones, a human skeleton lay, with a few shreds of clothing, on the ground.
  • A frame that provides support to a building or other construction.
  • (figuratively) A very thin person.
  • She lost so much weight while she was ill that she became a skeleton.
  • (From the sled used, which originally was a bare frame, like a skeleton.) A type of tobogganing in which competitors lie face down, and descend head first (compare luge). See
  • (computing) A client-helper procedure that communicates with a stub.
  • RMI Nomenclature: in RMI, the client helper is a 'stub' and the service helper is a 'skeleton'.
  • (geometry) The vertices and edges of a polyhedron, taken collectively.
  • An anthropomorphic representation of a skeleton. See
  • She dressed up as a skeleton for Halloween.
  • (figuratively) The central core of something that gives shape to the entire structure.
  • The skeleton of the organisation is essentially the same as it was ten years ago, but many new faces have come and gone.

    Synonyms

    * (anatomy) ottomy (obsolete) * (type of tobogganing) skeleton tobogganing * (central core giving shape to something) backbone * (very thin person) See also

    Antonyms

    * (computing) stub

    Derived terms

    * skeletal * skeletally

    See also

    * bone * luge

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) to reduce to a skeleton; to skin; to skeletonize
  • (archaic) to minimize
  • ----