Blueprint vs Skeleton - What's the difference?

blueprint | skeleton |


As nouns the difference between blueprint and skeleton

is that blueprint is a type of paper-based reproduction process producing white-on-blue images, used primarily for technical and architecture's drawings, now largely replaced by other technologies while skeleton is (anatomy) the system that provides support to an organism, internal and made up of bones and cartilage in vertebrates, external in some other animals.

As verbs the difference between blueprint and skeleton

is that blueprint is to make a blueprint for while skeleton is (archaic) to reduce to a skeleton; to skin; to skeletonize.

blueprint

Alternative forms

* blue print, blue-print

Noun

(en noun)
  • A type of paper-based reproduction process producing white-on-blue images, used primarily for technical and architecture's drawings, now largely replaced by other technologies.
  • A print produced with this process.
  • (architecture, engineering, by extension) A detailed technical drawing (now often in some electronically storable and transmissible form).
  • (informal, by extension) Any detailed plan, whether literal or figurative.
  • Synonyms

    * (paper-based technical drawing) cyanotype, schematic * (detailed technical drawing) schematic * (informal) road map, schematic, plan, layout

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a blueprint for.
  • The architect blueprinted the renovation plan once the client had signed off.
  • To make a detailed operational plan for.
  • They blueprinted every aspect of the first phase of the operation.

    skeleton

    English

    {{ picdic , image= Human skeleton front arrows no labels.svg , width=285 , height=300 , labels= , detail1=Click on labels in the image , detail2= }} (wikipedia skeleton)

    Alternative forms

    * sceleton

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (anatomy) The system that provides support to an organism, internal and made up of bones and cartilage in vertebrates, external in some other animals.
  • * 1883 , ,
  • At the foot of a pretty big pine, and involved in a green creeper, which had even partly lifted some of the smaller bones, a human skeleton lay, with a few shreds of clothing, on the ground.
  • A frame that provides support to a building or other construction.
  • (figuratively) A very thin person.
  • She lost so much weight while she was ill that she became a skeleton.
  • (From the sled used, which originally was a bare frame, like a skeleton.) A type of tobogganing in which competitors lie face down, and descend head first (compare luge). See
  • (computing) A client-helper procedure that communicates with a stub.
  • RMI Nomenclature: in RMI, the client helper is a 'stub' and the service helper is a 'skeleton'.
  • (geometry) The vertices and edges of a polyhedron, taken collectively.
  • An anthropomorphic representation of a skeleton. See
  • She dressed up as a skeleton for Halloween.
  • (figuratively) The central core of something that gives shape to the entire structure.
  • The skeleton of the organisation is essentially the same as it was ten years ago, but many new faces have come and gone.

    Synonyms

    * (anatomy) ottomy (obsolete) * (type of tobogganing) skeleton tobogganing * (central core giving shape to something) backbone * (very thin person) See also

    Antonyms

    * (computing) stub

    Derived terms

    * skeletal * skeletally

    See also

    * bone * luge

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) to reduce to a skeleton; to skin; to skeletonize
  • (archaic) to minimize
  • ----