Language vs Sight - What's the difference?

language | sight |


As nouns the difference between language and sight

is that language is (lb) a body of words, and set of methods of combining them (called a grammar), understood by a community and used as a form of communication or language can be a languet, a flat plate in or below the flue pipe of an organ while sight is (in the singular) the ability to see.

As verbs the difference between language and sight

is that language is to communicate by language; to express in language while sight is to register visually.

language

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) language, from (etyl) language, from .

Noun

{{examples-right, The English Wiktionary uses the English language' to define words from all of the world's ' languages .


This person is saying "hello" in American sign language . }} (wikipedia language)
  • (lb) A body of words, and set of methods of combining them (called a grammar), understood by a community and used as a form of communication.
  • * 1867', ''Report on the Systems of Deaf-Mute Instruction pursued in Europe'', quoted in '''1983 in ''History of the College for the Deaf, 1857-1907 (ISBN 0913580856), page 240:
  • Hence the natural language' of the mute is, in schools of this class, suppressed as soon and as far as possible, and its existence as a ' language , capable of being made the reliable and precise vehicle for the widest range of thought, is ignored.
  • * {{quote-book, page=50, year=1900, author=(w)
  • , title= The History of the Caliph Vathek , passage=No language could express his rage and despair.}}
  • * 2000 , Geary Hobson, The Last of the Ofos (ISBN 0816519595), page 113:
  • Mr. Darko, generally acknowledged to be the last surviving member of the Ofo Tribe, was also the last remaining speaker of the tribe's language .
  • (lb) The ability to communicate using words.
  • (lb) The vocabulary and usage of a particular specialist field.
  • *
  • Thus, when he drew up instructions in lawyer language , he expressed the important words by an initial, a medial, or a final consonant, and made scratches for all the words between; his clerks, however, understood him very well.
  • The expression of thought (the communication of meaning) in a specified way.
  • * 2001 , Eugene C. Kennedy, ?Sara C. Charles, On Becoming a Counselor (ISBN 0824519132):
  • A tale about themselves [is] told by people with help from the universal languages of their eyes, their hands, and even their shirting feet.
  • A body of sounds, signs and signals by which animals communicate, and by which plants are sometimes also thought to communicate.
  • A computer language; a machine language.
  • * 2015 , Kent D. Lee, Foundations of Programming Languages (ISBN 3319133144), page 94:
  • In fact pointers are called references in these languages' to distinguish them from pointers in ' languages like C and C++.
  • (lb) Manner of expression.
  • * (rfdate) Cowper:
  • Their language simple, as their manners meek,
  • (lb) The particular words used in a speech or a passage of text.
  • (lb) Profanity.
  • *{{quote-book, page=500, year=1978, author=James Carroll
  • , title= Mortal Friends, isbn=0440157897 , passage="Where the hell is Horace?" ΒΆ "There he is. He's coming. You shouldn't use language ."}}
    Synonyms
    * (form of communication) tongue, speech (spoken language) * (vocabulary of a particular field) lingo (colloquial), jargon, terminology, phraseology, parlance * (computer language) computer language, programming language, machine language * (particular words used) phrasing, wording, terminology
    Derived terms
    * artificial language * auxiliary language * bad language * body language * computing language * constructed language * endangered language * extinct language * foreign language * formal language * foul language * international language * language barrier * language code * language cop * language death * language extinction * language family * language lab, language laboratory * language model * language of flowers * language planning * language police * language pollution * language processing * language school * language shift * language technology * language transfer * languaging * machine language * mathematical language * mind one's language * natural language * pattern language * programming language * private language * secular language * sign language * speak someone's language * standard language * vehicular language * vernacular language

    Verb

  • To communicate by language; to express in language.
  • * (rfdate) Fuller:
  • Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense.

    See also

    * lexis, term, word * bilingual * linguistics * multilingual * trilingual

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A languet, a flat plate in or below the flue pipe of an organ.
  • * 1896 , William Horatio Clarke, The Organist's Retrospect , page 79:
  • A flue-pipe is one in which the air passes through the throat, or flue, which is the narrow, longitudinal aperture between the lower lip and the tongue, or language'.

    Statistics

    * ----

    sight

    English

    Noun

  • (in the singular) The ability to see.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thy sight is young, / And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle.
  • * Milton
  • O loss of sight , of thee I most complain!
  • The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view.
  • to gain sight of land
  • * Bible, Acts i. 9
  • A cloud received him out of their sight .
  • Something seen.
  • * 2005 , Lesley Brown (translator), :
  • * He's a really remarkable man and it's very hard to get him in one's sights ;
  • Something worth seeing; a spectacle.
  • You really look a sight in that silly costume!
  • * Bible, Exodus iii. 3
  • Moses said, I will now turn aside and see this great sight , why the bush is not burnt.
  • * Spenser
  • They never saw a sight so fair.
  • A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.
  • A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained.
  • the sight of a quadrant
  • * Shakespeare
  • their eyes of fire sparking through sights of steel
  • a great deal, a lot; (frequently used to intensify a comparative).
  • a sight of money
    This is a darn sight better than what I'm used to at home!
  • * Gower
  • a wonder sight of flowers
  • * 1913 ,
  • "If your mother put you in the pit at twelve, it's no reason why I should do the same with my lad."
    "Twelve! It wor a sight afore that!"
  • In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame, the open space, the opening.
  • (obsolete) The instrument of seeing; the eye.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Why cloud they not their sights ?
  • Mental view; opinion; judgment.
  • In their sight it was harmless.
    (Wake)
  • * Bible, Luke xvi. 15
  • That which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

    Synonyms

    * (ability to see) sense of sight, vision * (something seen) view * (aiming device) scope, peep sight

    Derived terms

    * sight for sore eyes * far-sighted * in sight * insight * long-sighted * near-sighted * not a pretty sight * at sight * on sight * out of sight * * outsight * second sight * short-sighted * sight cheque * sight draft * sight for sore eyes * sight gag * sight rhyme * sight unseen

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To register visually.
  • To get sight of (something).
  • * , chapter=4
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=I was on my way to the door, but all at once, through the fog in my head, I began to sight one reef that I hadn't paid any attention to afore.}}
  • To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight.
  • To take aim at.
  • Synonyms

    * (visually register) see * (get sight of) espy, glimpse, spot * (take aim) aim at, take aim at

    Derived terms

    * resight

    See also

    * see * vision

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

    *