Select vs Sift - What's the difference?

select | sift |


As an adjective select

is select.

As a verb sift is

to sieve or strain (something).

select

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Privileged, specially selected.
  • :
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:A few select spirits had separated from the crowd, and formed a fit audience round a far greater teacher.
  • *
  • *:At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors.In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
  • Of high quality; top-notch.
  • :
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To choose one or more elements of a set, especially a set of options.
  • He looked over the menu, and selected the roast beef.
    The program computes all the students' grades, then selects a random sample for human verification.

    Synonyms

    * (to choose) choose, opt

    Anagrams

    *

    sift

    English

    Verb

  • To sieve or strain (something).
  • To separate or scatter (things) as if by sieving.
  • To examine (something) carefully.
  • * 1748 . David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 28.
  • But if we still carry on our sifting humour, and ask, What is the foundation of all conclusions from experience ? this implies a new question.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1764 , author= , title= , pageurl=http://www.gutenberg.org/files/696/696-h/696-h.htm , page= , publisher=}}
    It immediately occurred to him to sift her on the subject of Isabella and Theodore.

    Derived terms

    * sifter

    Anagrams

    * *