Side vs Walk - What's the difference?

side | walk |


As nouns the difference between side and walk

is that side is a bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape while walk is a trip made by walking.

As verbs the difference between side and walk

is that side is to ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with" while walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

As a adjective side

is wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.

As a adverb side

is widely; wide; far.

side

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) side, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape.
  • :
  • A flat surface of a three-dimensional object; a face.
  • :
  • One half (left or right, top or bottom, front or back, etc.) of something or someone.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine.
  • *, chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side , and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}
  • A region in a specified position with respect to something.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
  • One surface of a sheet of paper (used instead of "page", which can mean one or both surfaces.)
  • :
  • One possible aspect of a concept, person or thing.
  • :
  • One set of competitors in a game.
  • :
  • A sports team.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1988, author=Ken Jones, coauthor=Crown, Pat Welton, title=Soccer skills & tactics, page=9
  • , passage=Newly promoted, they were top of the First Division and unbeaten when they took on a Manchester United side that had been revitalized by a new manager,
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 28, author=Jon Smith, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Valencia 1-1 Chelsea , passage=It was no less than Valencia deserved after dominating possession in the final 20 minutes although Chelsea defended resolutely and restricted the Spanish side to shooting from long range.}}
  • *2011 , Nick Cain, Greg Growden, Rugby Union For Dummies , UK Edition, 3rd Edition, p.220:
  • *:Initially, the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish unions refused to send national sides', preferring instead to send touring ' sides like the Barbarians, the Penguins, the Co-Optimists, the Wolfhounds, Crawshays Welsh, and the Public School Wanderers.
  • A group having a particular allegiance in a conflict or competition.
  • :
  • * Landor
  • *:We have not always been of thesame side in politics.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • *:sets the passions on the side of truth
  • Sidespin; english
  • :
  • A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being watched (lb).
  • :
  • A dish that accompanies the main course; a side dish.
  • :
  • A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
  • * Milton
  • *:To sit upon thy father David's throne, / By mother's side thy father.
  • Synonyms
    * (bounding straight edge of an object) edge * (flat surface of an object) face * (left or right half) half * (surface of a sheet of paper) page * (region in a specified position with respect to something) * (one possible aspect of a concept) * (set of opponents in a game) team * (group having a particular allegiance in a war) * (television channel) channel, station (US)
    Derived terms
    * * aside * countryside * driverside * five-a-side * guide on the side * hillside * inside * mountainside * offside * other side * outside * quayside * riverside * roadside * seaside * sideband * sideboard * sideburn, sideburns * side by side * sidecar * side dish * side effect * side issue * sidekick * sidelight * sideline * sidelong * side on * side-saddle, sidesaddle * side scroller * side-splitting * side street * sideswipe * sidetrack * sidewalk * sidewall * sideways * sidewinder * split one's sides * take sides * topside * underside * upside

    Verb

    (sid)
  • To ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with"
  • Which will you side with , good or evil?
  • * 1597 , Francis Bacon, Essays – "Of Great Place":
  • All rising to great place is by a winding star; and if there be factions, it is good to side a man's self, whilst he is in the rising, and to balance himself when he is placed.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • All side in parties, and begin the attack.
  • * 1958 , Archer Fullingim, The Kountze [Texas] News, August 28, 1958 :
  • How does it feel... to... side in with those who voted against you in 1947?
  • To lean on one side.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • (obsolete) To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
  • * Spenser
  • His blind eye that sided Paridell.
  • (obsolete) To suit; to pair; to match.
  • (Clarendon)
  • (shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
  • To furnish with a siding.
  • to side a house
    Synonyms
    * (ally oneself) * take side
    Derived terms
    * side with * siding
    See also
    * ally * alliance * join in

    Statistics

    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) side, syde, syd, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Being on the left or right, or toward the left or right; lateral.
  • * Dryden
  • One mighty squadron with a side wind sped.
  • Indirect; oblique; incidental.
  • a side''' issue; a '''side view or remark
  • * Hooker
  • The law hath no side respect to their persons.
  • Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.
  • * Laneham
  • His gown had side sleeves down to mid leg.
    (Shakespeare)
  • (Scotland) Far; distant.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) side, syde, from (etyl) . See above.

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Widely; wide; far.
  • Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk