Love vs Side - What's the difference?

love | side |


As a noun love

is money.

As a proper noun side is

an ancient city on a small peninsula on the mediterranean coast of anatolia, settled by greeks from cyme.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

love

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) . The closing-of-a-letter sense is presumably a truncation of With love or the like. The verb is from (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

Noun

  • (label) Strong affection.
  • # An intense feeling of affection and care towards another person.
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.}}
  • # A deep or abiding liking for something.
  • # A profound and caring attraction towards someone.
  • #* (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • He on his side / Leaning half-raised, with looks of cordial love / Hung over her enamoured.
  • (countable) The object of one’s romantic feelings; a darling or sweetheart.
  • * (Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • Open the temple gates unto my love .
  • (colloquial)
  • (euphemistic) A sexual desire; sexual activity.
  • *1986, Ben Elton & al., ":
  • *:—What think you, my lord, of... love ?
  • *:—You mean ‘rumpy-pumpy’.
  • (obsolete) A thin silk material.
  • * 1664 , (Robert Boyle), Experiments and Considerations Touching Colours,
  • Such a kind of transparency, as that of a Sive, a piece of Cyprus, or a Love -Hood.
  • A climbing plant, Clematis vitalba .
  • Synonyms
    * (sense) baby, darling, lover, pet, sweetheart, honey, love bird * (term of address) mate, lover. darling, sweety
    Antonyms
    * (strong affection) hate, hatred, angst; malice, spite * (absence of love) indifference

    Verb

    (lov)
  • To have a strong affection for (someone or something).
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter VI
  • I wanted to take her in my arms and tell her how I loved her, and had taken her hand from the rail and started to draw her toward me when Olson came blundering up on deck with his bedding.
  • * 2013 February 26, and (Nate Ruess), (Just Give Me a Reason) :
  • Just give me a reason, / just a little bit's enough, / just a second we're not broken, just bent / and we can learn to love again.
  • To need, thrive on.
  • (colloquial) To be strongly inclined towards something; an emphatic form of like .
  • To care deeply about, to be dedicated to (someone or something).
  • * John 3:16
  • For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.
  • * Matthew: 37-38
  • You shall love' the Lord your God with your whole heart, and your whole mind, and your whole soul; you shall ' love your neighbor as yourself.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=27, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about […], or offering services that let you
  • To derive delight from a fact or situation.
  • To lust for.
  • (euphemistic) To have sex with, (perhaps from make love.)
  • Antonyms
    * hate, despise
    Derived terms
    * all's fair in love and war * cupboard love * in love * I love you * fall in love * first love * lady love * love affair * love at first sight * love bird/lovebird * love bite/lovebite * love bomb * love bug * lovebunny * love child * loved-up * love egg * love feast * love game * love grass * love handle * love-hate * love-in * love-in-a-mist * love is blind * love life * lovely * love-making * love match * love nest * love potion * lover * love rat * lovertine * love seat * loveship * love-shyness * lovesick * love song * lovestone * love story * love tap * love toy * love triangle * lovey-dovey * loving kindness * loyal love * make love * unrequited love * no love lost * puppy love * tough love * true love * unconditional love

    See also

    * charity

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) . See also (l).

    Verb

    (lov)
  • To praise; commend.
  • To praise as of value; prize; set a price on.
  • Etymology 3

    From the phrase Neither for love nor for money , meaning "nothing". The previously held belief that it originated from the (etyl) term , due to its shape, is no longer widely accepted.

    Noun

    (-)
  • (racquet sports) Zero, no score.
  • So that’s fifteen-love to Kournikova.
  • * The Field
  • He won the match by three sets to love .
  • * John Betjeman, A Subaltern's Love Song
  • Love -thirty, love-forty, oh! weakness of joy, / The speed of a swallow, the grace of a boy, / With carefullest carelessness, gaily you won, / I am weak from your loveliness, Joan Hunter Dunn.

    Statistics

    *

    side

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) side, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape.
  • :
  • A flat surface of a three-dimensional object; a face.
  • :
  • One half (left or right, top or bottom, front or back, etc.) of something or someone.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine.
  • *, chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side , and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}
  • A region in a specified position with respect to something.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
  • One surface of a sheet of paper (used instead of "page", which can mean one or both surfaces.)
  • :
  • One possible aspect of a concept, person or thing.
  • :
  • One set of competitors in a game.
  • :
  • A sports team.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1988, author=Ken Jones, coauthor=Crown, Pat Welton, title=Soccer skills & tactics, page=9
  • , passage=Newly promoted, they were top of the First Division and unbeaten when they took on a Manchester United side that had been revitalized by a new manager,
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 28, author=Jon Smith, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Valencia 1-1 Chelsea , passage=It was no less than Valencia deserved after dominating possession in the final 20 minutes although Chelsea defended resolutely and restricted the Spanish side to shooting from long range.}}
  • *2011 , Nick Cain, Greg Growden, Rugby Union For Dummies , UK Edition, 3rd Edition, p.220:
  • *:Initially, the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish unions refused to send national sides', preferring instead to send touring ' sides like the Barbarians, the Penguins, the Co-Optimists, the Wolfhounds, Crawshays Welsh, and the Public School Wanderers.
  • A group having a particular allegiance in a conflict or competition.
  • :
  • * Landor
  • *:We have not always been of thesame side in politics.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • *:sets the passions on the side of truth
  • Sidespin; english
  • :
  • A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being watched (lb).
  • :
  • A dish that accompanies the main course; a side dish.
  • :
  • A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
  • * Milton
  • *:To sit upon thy father David's throne, / By mother's side thy father.
  • Synonyms
    * (bounding straight edge of an object) edge * (flat surface of an object) face * (left or right half) half * (surface of a sheet of paper) page * (region in a specified position with respect to something) * (one possible aspect of a concept) * (set of opponents in a game) team * (group having a particular allegiance in a war) * (television channel) channel, station (US)
    Derived terms
    * * aside * countryside * driverside * five-a-side * guide on the side * hillside * inside * mountainside * offside * other side * outside * quayside * riverside * roadside * seaside * sideband * sideboard * sideburn, sideburns * side by side * sidecar * side dish * side effect * side issue * sidekick * sidelight * sideline * sidelong * side on * side-saddle, sidesaddle * side scroller * side-splitting * side street * sideswipe * sidetrack * sidewalk * sidewall * sideways * sidewinder * split one's sides * take sides * topside * underside * upside

    Verb

    (sid)
  • To ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with"
  • Which will you side with , good or evil?
  • * 1597 , Francis Bacon, Essays – "Of Great Place":
  • All rising to great place is by a winding star; and if there be factions, it is good to side a man's self, whilst he is in the rising, and to balance himself when he is placed.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • All side in parties, and begin the attack.
  • * 1958 , Archer Fullingim, The Kountze [Texas] News, August 28, 1958 :
  • How does it feel... to... side in with those who voted against you in 1947?
  • To lean on one side.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • (obsolete) To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
  • * Spenser
  • His blind eye that sided Paridell.
  • (obsolete) To suit; to pair; to match.
  • (Clarendon)
  • (shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
  • To furnish with a siding.
  • to side a house
    Synonyms
    * (ally oneself) * take side
    Derived terms
    * side with * siding
    See also
    * ally * alliance * join in

    Statistics

    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) side, syde, syd, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Being on the left or right, or toward the left or right; lateral.
  • * Dryden
  • One mighty squadron with a side wind sped.
  • Indirect; oblique; incidental.
  • a side''' issue; a '''side view or remark
  • * Hooker
  • The law hath no side respect to their persons.
  • Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.
  • * Laneham
  • His gown had side sleeves down to mid leg.
    (Shakespeare)
  • (Scotland) Far; distant.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) side, syde, from (etyl) . See above.

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Widely; wide; far.
  • Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----