Side vs Across - What's the difference?

side | across |


As adverbs the difference between side and across

is that side is widely; wide; far while across is from one side to the other.

As nouns the difference between side and across

is that side is a bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape while across is (crosswords) a clue whose solution runs horizontally in the grid.

As a adjective side

is wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.

As a verb side

is to ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with".

As a preposition across is

to, toward or from the far side of (something that lies between two points of interest).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

side

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) side, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape.
  • :
  • A flat surface of a three-dimensional object; a face.
  • :
  • One half (left or right, top or bottom, front or back, etc.) of something or someone.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine.
  • *, chapter=23
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side , and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}
  • A region in a specified position with respect to something.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
  • One surface of a sheet of paper (used instead of "page", which can mean one or both surfaces.)
  • :
  • One possible aspect of a concept, person or thing.
  • :
  • One set of competitors in a game.
  • :
  • A sports team.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1988, author=Ken Jones, coauthor=Crown, Pat Welton, title=Soccer skills & tactics, page=9
  • , passage=Newly promoted, they were top of the First Division and unbeaten when they took on a Manchester United side that had been revitalized by a new manager,
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 28, author=Jon Smith, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Valencia 1-1 Chelsea , passage=It was no less than Valencia deserved after dominating possession in the final 20 minutes although Chelsea defended resolutely and restricted the Spanish side to shooting from long range.}}
  • *2011 , Nick Cain, Greg Growden, Rugby Union For Dummies , UK Edition, 3rd Edition, p.220:
  • *:Initially, the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish unions refused to send national sides', preferring instead to send touring ' sides like the Barbarians, the Penguins, the Co-Optimists, the Wolfhounds, Crawshays Welsh, and the Public School Wanderers.
  • A group having a particular allegiance in a conflict or competition.
  • :
  • * Landor
  • *:We have not always been of thesame side in politics.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • *:sets the passions on the side of truth
  • Sidespin; english
  • :
  • A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being watched (lb).
  • :
  • A dish that accompanies the main course; a side dish.
  • :
  • A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
  • * Milton
  • *:To sit upon thy father David's throne, / By mother's side thy father.
  • Synonyms
    * (bounding straight edge of an object) edge * (flat surface of an object) face * (left or right half) half * (surface of a sheet of paper) page * (region in a specified position with respect to something) * (one possible aspect of a concept) * (set of opponents in a game) team * (group having a particular allegiance in a war) * (television channel) channel, station (US)
    Derived terms
    * * aside * countryside * driverside * five-a-side * guide on the side * hillside * inside * mountainside * offside * other side * outside * quayside * riverside * roadside * seaside * sideband * sideboard * sideburn, sideburns * side by side * sidecar * side dish * side effect * side issue * sidekick * sidelight * sideline * sidelong * side on * side-saddle, sidesaddle * side scroller * side-splitting * side street * sideswipe * sidetrack * sidewalk * sidewall * sideways * sidewinder * split one's sides * take sides * topside * underside * upside

    Verb

    (sid)
  • To ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with "with" or rarely "in with"
  • Which will you side with , good or evil?
  • * 1597 , Francis Bacon, Essays – "Of Great Place":
  • All rising to great place is by a winding star; and if there be factions, it is good to side a man's self, whilst he is in the rising, and to balance himself when he is placed.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • All side in parties, and begin the attack.
  • * 1958 , Archer Fullingim, The Kountze [Texas] News, August 28, 1958 :
  • How does it feel... to... side in with those who voted against you in 1947?
  • To lean on one side.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • (obsolete) To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
  • * Spenser
  • His blind eye that sided Paridell.
  • (obsolete) To suit; to pair; to match.
  • (Clarendon)
  • (shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
  • To furnish with a siding.
  • to side a house
    Synonyms
    * (ally oneself) * take side
    Derived terms
    * side with * siding
    See also
    * ally * alliance * join in

    Statistics

    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) side, syde, syd, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Being on the left or right, or toward the left or right; lateral.
  • * Dryden
  • One mighty squadron with a side wind sped.
  • Indirect; oblique; incidental.
  • a side''' issue; a '''side view or remark
  • * Hooker
  • The law hath no side respect to their persons.
  • Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.
  • * Laneham
  • His gown had side sleeves down to mid leg.
    (Shakespeare)
  • (Scotland) Far; distant.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) side, syde, from (etyl) . See above.

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Widely; wide; far.
  • Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    across

    English

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • To, toward or from the far side of (something that lies between two points of interest).
  • On the opposite side of (something that lies between two points of interest).
  • (Southern US, AAVE)  On the opposite side, relative to something that lies between, from (a point of interest).
  • * 1994 June 21, Thong P Tong <[email protected]>, "Re: Battle Tech Center", message-ID <[email protected]>, comp.sys.ibm.pc.games , Usenet [http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.ibm.pc.games/msg/28d5e0700985bbe6]:
  • And make sure you're parked across the mall in the outside lot. Last time I was there, I parked in a parking structure and paid an arm and a leg for it.
  • * 1995 , (Ronald Kessler), Inside the White House , 1996 edition, ISBN 0671879197, page 243 [http://books.google.com/books?id=lJz-yIZNE2sC&pg=PA243&dq=across]:
  • On another occasion, Clinton asked to drive him to Chelsea's school, Booker Elementary, where Clinton met the department store clerk and climbed into her car.
    "I parked across the entrance and stood outside the car looking around, about 120 feet from where they were parked in a lot that was pretty well lit," Patterson recalled. "They stayed in the car for thirty to forty minutes."
  • From one side to the other within (a space being traversed).
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=I corralled the judge, and we started off across the fields, in no very mild state of fear of that gentleman's wife, whose vigilance was seldom relaxed. And thus we came by a circuitous route to Mohair, the judge occupied by his own guilty thoughts, and I by others not less disturbing.}}
  • At or near the far end of (a space).
  • * 2004 , (Josephine Cox), Lovers and Liars , ISBN 0060525479, page 78 [http://books.google.com/books?id=MSZf-siTBGUC&pg=PA78&dq=across]:
  • "Mam's baking and Cathleen's asleep. I've got a pile of washing bubbling in the copper, so I'd best be off." With that she was across the room and out the door.
  • Spanning.
  • Throughout.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2012, month=March-April, author=Anna Lena Phillips, volume=100, issue=2, page=172
  • , magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Sneaky Silk Moths , passage=Last spring, the periodical cicadas emerged across eastern North America. Their vast numbers and short above-ground life spans inspired awe and irritation in humans—and made for good meals for birds and small mammals.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author= Chico Harlan
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=30, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Japan pockets the subsidy … , passage=Across Japan, technology companies and private investors are racing to install devices that until recently they had little interest in: solar panels. Massive solar parks are popping up as part of a rapid build-up that one developer likened to an "explosion."}}
  • So as to intersect or pass through or over at an angle.
  • * 2010 , (Alex Bledsoe), The Girls with Games of Blood , , ISBN 9780765323842, page 147 [http://books.google.com/books?id=3O878YujdCEC&pg=PA147&dq=across]:
  • He parked across the end of the driveway, blocking her in.

    Derived terms

    * across-the-board * come across * get across * put across * put one across * run across

    Adverb

    (-)
  • From one side to the other.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Welcome to the plastisphere , passage=[The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across . Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria, […].}}
  • On the other side.
  • In a particular direction.
  • (crosswords) Horizontally.
  • Noun

    (es)
  • (crosswords) A clue whose solution runs horizontally in the grid.
  • I solved all of the acrosses , but then got stuck on 3 down.

    Statistics

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