Sickles vs Sicklies - What's the difference?

sickles | sicklies |


As verbs the difference between sickles and sicklies

is that sickles is (sickle) while sicklies is (sickly).

As a noun sickles

is .

sickles

English

Noun

(head)
  • Verb

    (head)
  • (sickle)
  • sicklies

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (sickly)

  • sickly

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Frequently ill; often in poor health; given to becoming ill.
  • a sickly child
  • Having the appearance of sickness or ill health; appearing ill, infirm or unhealthy; pale.
  • a sickly plant
  • * Dryden
  • The moon grows sickly at the sight of day.
  • Weak; faint; suggesting unhappiness.
  • a sickly smile
  • Somewhat sick; disposed to illness; attended with disease.
  • * Shakespeare
  • This physic but prolongs thy sickly days.
  • Tending to produce disease.
  • a sickly''' autumn; a '''sickly climate
    (Cowper)
  • Tending to produce nausea; sickening.
  • a sickly''' smell; '''sickly sentimentality

    Verb

  • To make sickly.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought.
  • * 1840 , S. M. Heaton, George Heaton, Thoughts on the Litany, by a naval officer's orphan daughter (page 58)
  • * 1871 , Gail Hamilton, Country living and country thinking (page 109)
  • He evidently thinks the sweet little innocents never heard or thought of such a thing before, and would go on burying their curly heads in books, and sicklying their rosy faces with "the pale cast of thought" till the end of time

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • In a sick manner.
  • * 2010 , Rowan Somerville, The End of Sleep (page 66)
  • The creaseless horizontal face of the giant smiled sickly , leering.