While vs Shout - What's the difference?

while | shout |


In lang=en terms the difference between while and shout

is that while is to pass (time) idly while shout is to utter with a shout; to cry; -- sometimes with out; as, to shout, or to shout out, a man's name.

As nouns the difference between while and shout

is that while is an uncertain duration of time, a period of time while shout is a loud burst of voice or voices; a vehement and sudden outcry, especially that of a multitude expressing joy, triumph, exultation, or animated courage.

As verbs the difference between while and shout

is that while is to pass (time) idly while shout is to utter a sudden and loud outcry, as in joy, triumph, or exultation, or to attract attention, to animate soldiers, etc.

As a conjunction while

is during the same time that.

while

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • An uncertain duration of time, a period of time.
  • He lectured for quite a long while .

    Conjunction

    (wikipedia while) (English Conjunctions)
  • During the same time that.
  • * , chapter=12
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=While the powwow was going on the big woman came back again. She was consider'ble rumpled and scratched up, but there was fire in her eye.}}
  • * 1948 , , North from Mexico / The Spanish-Speaking People of The United States , J. B. Lippincott Company, page 25,
  • While De Anza was exploring the Bay of San Francisco, seeking a site for the presidio, the American colonists on the eastern seaboard, three thousand miles away, were celebrating the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=David Simpson
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=36, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Fantasy of navigation , passage=Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.}}
  • Although.
  • * 2013 September 28, (Kenan Malik), " London Is Special, but Not That Special," New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
  • While Britain’s recession has been deep and unforgiving, in London it has been relatively shallow.
  • (Northern England, Scotland) Until.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • I may be conveyed into your chamber; I'll lie under your bed while midnight.
  • As long as.
  • * I. Watts
  • Use your memory; you will sensibly experience a gradual improvement, while you take care not to overload it.

    Verb

    (whil)
  • To pass (time) idly.
  • * Longfellow
  • The lovely lady whiled the hours away.
  • To loiter.
  • (Spectator)

    Derived terms

    * while away * meanwhile * the while

    shout

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A loud burst of voice or voices; a vehement and sudden outcry, especially that of a multitude expressing joy, triumph, exultation, or animated courage.
  • (UK, Australia, New Zealand, slang) A round of drinks in a pub; the turn to pay the shot or scot; an act of paying for a round of drinks.
  • * 1984 , , page 290,
  • “I?ll get my wine though,” taking out her wallet.
    “No. This is my shout ,” holding up his hand as though to ward her money off.
  • * 2006 , (Lily Allen), Knock 'Em Out
  • Cut to the pub on a lads night out,
    Man at the bar cos it was his shout
  • * 2008 , George Papaellinas, The Trip: An Odyssey , re.press, Australia, page 6,
  • It was always my shout down the pub with Theo.
  • (UK, Australia, jargon, slang) A call-out for an emergency services team.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To utter a sudden and loud outcry, as in joy, triumph, or exultation, or to attract attention, to animate soldiers, etc.
  • * '', Act I, Scene II, 1797, George Steevens (editor), ''The Plays of William Shakespeare , Volume 7, page 15,
  • They ?houted thrice; what was the la?t cry for?
  • To utter with a shout; to cry; -- sometimes with out; as, to shout, or to shout out, a man's name.
  • (obsolete) To treat with shouts or clamor.
  • (Bishop Hall)
  • (colloquial) To pay for food, drink or entertainment for others.
  • I?ll shout you all a drink.
    He?s shouting us all to the opening night of the play.
  • * 1999 , Peter Moore, The Wrong Way Home: London to Sydney the Hard Way , page 301,
  • After shouting me a plate of noodles and limp vegetables, he helped me change money by introducing me to the stallholder who offered the best exchange rates.
  • * 2003 , Peter Watt, To Chase the Storm , Pan MacMillan Australia, unnumbered page,
  • ‘I have not seen my cousin Patrick in years,’ Martin answered defensively. ‘I doubt that, considering the way our lives have gone, an officer of the King?s army would be shouting me a drink in Mr O?Riley?s pub these days.’
  • * 2005 , George G. Spearing, Dances with Marmots: A Pacific Crest Trail Adventure , page 32,
  • Anyhow, he obviously bore no grudge against Kiwis, for he shouted me a beer and opened another one for himself, punctuating the operation with a spectacular and resounding fart that by all the laws of physical science should have left his trousers flapping in smouldering shreds.
  • * 2010 , Ivan Dunn, The Legend of Beau Baxter , HarperCollins Publishers, New Zealand, unnumbered page,
  • Truth is, I notice the other blokes who have been shouting me nodding among themselves and thinking they?d better get in the queue if I am buying. Not likely. I am out of there.
  • (Internet) To post a text message (for example, email) in upper case.
  • Please don't shout in the chat room.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * shout down * shout out

    See also

    * (l)