Knee vs Shoulder - What's the difference?

knee | shoulder |


In lang=en terms the difference between knee and shoulder

is that knee is to poke or strike with the knee while shoulder is to move by or as if by using one's shoulders.

As nouns the difference between knee and shoulder

is that knee is in humans, the joint or the region of the joint in the middle part of the leg between the thigh and the shank while shoulder is (lb) the part of an animal's body between the base of the neck and forearm socket .

As verbs the difference between knee and shoulder

is that knee is (archaic) to kneel to while shoulder is to push (a person or thing) using one's shoulder.

knee

English

Noun

(en-noun)
  • In humans, the joint or the region of the joint in the middle part of the leg between the thigh and the shank.
  • Penny was wearing a miniskirt, so she skinned her exposed knees when she fell.
  • In the horse and allied animals, the carpal joint, corresponding to the wrist in humans.
  • The part of a garment that covers the knee.
  • (shipbuilding) A piece of timber or metal formed with an angle somewhat in the shape of the human knee when bent.
  • * 1980 , Richard W. Unger, The Ship in the Medieval Economy 600-1600 , page 41
  • Deck beams were supported by hanging knees , triangular pieces of wood typically found underneath the timbers they are designed to support, but in this case found above them.
  • (archaic) An act of kneeling, especially to show respect or courtesy.
  • * circa'' 1605 , (William Shakepeare), ''(Timon of Athens) , Act III, scene iii, line 36
  • Give them title, knee , and approbation.
    To make a knee .
  • Any knee-shaped item or sharp angle in a line, "the knee of a graph", an inflection point.
  • A blow made with the knee; a kneeing.
  • Derived terms

    * down on one's knees * kneecap * kneejerk * kneel * kneepan * kneesies * knees-up

    Verb

    (d)
  • (archaic) To kneel to.
  • * 1605': I could as well be brought / To '''knee his throne and, squire-like, pension beg / To keep base life afoot. — William Shakespeare, ''King Lear II.ii
  • To poke or strike with the knee.
  • shoulder

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (lb) The part of an animal's body between the base of the neck and forearm socket.
  • #The part of the human torso forming a relatively horizontal surface running away from the neck.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:But then I had the flintlock by me for protection. ¶ There were giants in the days when that gun was made; for surely no modern mortal could have held that mass of metal steady to his shoulder . The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window.
  • #*
  • #*:With just the turn of a shoulder' she indicated the water front, where, at the end of the dock on which they stood, lay the good ship, ''Mount Vernon'', river packet, the black smoke already pouring from her stacks. In turn he smiled and also shrugged a ' shoulder .
  • #(lb) The joint between the arm and the torso, sometimes including the surrounding muscles, tendons, and ligaments.
  • #A cut of meat comprised of the upper joint of the foreleg and the surrounding muscle.
  • #The portion of a garment where the shoulder is clothed.
  • Anything forming a shape resembling a human shoulder.
  • A shelf between two levels.
  • #A part of a road where drivers may stop in an emergency; a hard shoulder.
  • #:
  • #The portion of a hill or mountain just below the peak.
  • #*Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • #*:the north western shoulder of the mountain
  • #The lateral protrusion of a hill or mountain.
  • #The angle of a bastion included between the face and flank.
  • #An abrupt projection which forms an abutment on an object, or limits motion, etc., such as the projection around a tenon at the end of a piece of timber.
  • (lb) The flat portion of type that is below the bevelled portion that joins up with the face.
  • The portion below the neck.
  • #(lb) The rounded portion of stringed instrument where the neck joins the body.
  • #The rounded portion of a bottle where the neck meets the body.
  • #(lb) The angled section between the neck and the main body of a cartridge.
  • (lb) That which supports or sustains; support.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:In thy shoulder do I build my seat.
  • Derived terms

    * cold shoulder * hard shoulder * rub shoulders * shoulder bag * shoulder blade * shoulder check * shoulder-length * shoulder pad * shoulder season * shoulder to cry on * straight from the shoulder * you can't put an old head on young shoulders

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To push (a person or thing) using one's shoulder.
  • * (rfdate) (Edmond Spenser)
  • As they the earth would shoulder from her seat.
  • * (rfdate) (Rowe)
  • ''Around her numberless the rabble flowed, / Shouldering each other, crowding for a view.
  • To carry (something) on one's shoulders.
  • (figuratively) To bear a burden, as a financial obligation.
  • *
  • To put (something) on one's shoulders.
  • *
  • (figuratively) To accept responsibility for.
  • shoulder the blame
  • To place (something) against one's shoulders.
  • *
  • To form a shape resembling a shoulder.
  • *
  • To move by or as if by using one's shoulders.
  • *
  • *