Harbor vs Shore - What's the difference?

harbor | shore |


As a noun harbor

is a sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may dock or anchor, especially for loading and unloading.

As a verb harbor

is to provide a harbor or safe place for.

As a proper noun shore is

.

harbor

English

Alternative forms

* harbour (Commonwealth) * herberwe (obsolete) * herborough (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may dock or anchor, especially for loading and unloading.
  • A harbor''', even if it is a little '''harbor , is a good thing, since adventurers come into it as well as go out, and the life in it grows strong, because it takes something from the world, and has something to give in return -
  • Any place of shelter.
  • The neighborhood is a well-known harbor for petty thieves.

    Derived terms

    * harborage * harbormaster * harbor seal * safe harbor

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To provide a harbor or safe place for.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.}}
  • To take refuge or shelter in a protected expanse of water.
  • To hold or persistently entertain in one's thoughts or mind.
  • See also

    * haven * dock

    References

    * * * * * Random House Webster's Unabridged Electronic Dictionary , 1987-1996.

    shore

    English

    (wikipedia shore)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl). Cognate to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Land adjoining a non-flowing body of water, such as an ocean, lake or pond.
  • * (Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • the fruitful shore of muddy Nile
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges
  • (from the perspective of one on a body of water) Land, usually near a port.
  • Usage notes
    * Generally, only the largest of rivers, which are often estuaries, are said to have shores . * Rivers and other flowing bodies of water are said to have (term). * River bank(s)'' outnumbers ''River shore(s) about 200:3 at COCA.
    Hyponyms
    * (land adjoining a large body of water) beach, headland, coast
    Derived terms
    * alongshore * ashore * backshore * bayshore * foreshore * inshore * lakeshore * lee shore * longshore * nearshore * onshore * offshore * seashore * shore bug * shore cod * shore crab * shore dinner * shore fly * shore lark * shore leave * shore patrol * shore pine * shore pit viper * shore plover * shore plum * shore snipe * shore thistle * shore teetan * shorebird * (adjective) * shoreface * shorefront * shoreland * shoreless * shoreline * shoreside * shoreward * shorewards * shoreweed * weather shore * windward shore

    Verb

    (shor)
  • (obsolete) To set on shore.
  • (Shakespeare)
    (Webster 1913)

    Etymology 2

    Of uncertain origin, but found in some other Germanic languages; compare Middle Dutch . http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shore?s=t

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A prop or strut supporting the weight or flooring above it.
  • The shores stayed upright during the earthquake.

    Verb

    (shor)
  • To provide with support.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • To reinforce (something at risk of failure).
  • My family shored me up after I failed the GED.
    The workers were shoring up the dock after part of it fell into the water.
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * reinforce, strengthen, support, buttress * prop up, bolster
    Derived terms
    * dogshore * shore up * shorer * (noun) * unshored

    Etymology 3

    See (shear)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (shear)
  • Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A sewer.
  • References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

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