Hay vs Shock - What's the difference?

hay | shock |


As nouns the difference between hay and shock

is that hay is (uncountable) grass cut and dried for use as animal fodder or hay can be the name of the letter for the h sound in pitman shorthand while shock is sudden, heavy impact or shock can be an arrangement of sheaves for drying, a stook.

As verbs the difference between hay and shock

is that hay is to cut grasses or herb plants for use as animal fodder while shock is to cause to be emotionally shocked or shock can be to collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

hay

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) (m), from (etyl) . More at (l).

Noun

  • (uncountable) Grass cut and dried for use as animal fodder.
  • * Camden
  • Make hay while the sun shines.
  • * C. L. Flint
  • Hay may be dried too much as well as too little.
  • (countable) Any mix of green leafy plants used for fodder.
  • (slang) Cannabis; marijuana.
  • * 1947 , William Burroughs, letter, 19 Feb 1947:
  • I would like some of that hay . Enclose $20.
  • A net set around the haunt of an animal, especially a rabbit.
  • (Rowe)
  • (obsolete) A hedge.
  • (obsolete) A circular country dance.
  • to dance the hay
    Derived terms
    * hay fever * hayloft, hay loft * haystack * hayward * hit the hay * make hay while the sun shines

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cut grasses or herb plants for use as animal fodder.
  • To lay snares for rabbits.
  • (Huloet)

    References

    Webster's Online Dictionary article on hay

    Etymology 2

    : From the sound it represents, by analogy with other letters such as kay'' and ''gay''. The expected form in English if the ''h'' had survived in the Latin name of the letter "h", ''h? .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The name of the letter for the h sound in Pitman shorthand.
  • Anagrams

    * * * ----

    shock

    English

    (wikipedia shock)

    Alternative forms

    * choque (obsolete)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Sudden, heavy impact.
  • The train hit the buffers with a great shock .
  • # (figuratively) Something so surprising that it is stunning.
  • # Electric shock, a sudden burst of electric energy, hitting an animate animal such as a human.
  • # Circulatory shock, a life-threatening medical emergency characterized by the inability of the circulatory system to supply enough oxygen to meet tissue requirements.
  • # A sudden or violent mental or emotional disturbance
  • (mathematics) A discontinuity arising in the solution of a partial differential equation.
  • Derived terms
    * bow shock * culture shock * economic shock * electric shock * shock absorber * shock jock * shock mount * shock rock * shock site * shock therapy * shock wave, shockwave * shocker * shocking pink * shockproof * shockumentary * shockvertising * supply shock * technology shock * termination shock * toxic shock syndrome
    Synonyms
    See

    References

    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cause to be emotionally shocked.
  • The disaster shocked the world.
  • To give an electric shock.
  • (obsolete) To meet with a shock; to meet in violent encounter.
  • * De Quincey
  • They saw the moment approach when the two parties would shock together.

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An arrangement of sheaves for drying, a stook.
  • * Tusser
  • Cause it on shocks to be by and by set.
  • * Thomson
  • Behind the master walks, builds up the shocks .
  • (commerce, dated) A lot consisting of sixty pieces; a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods.
  • (by extension) A tuft or bunch of something (e.g. hair, grass)
  • a head covered with a shock of sandy hair
  • (obsolete, by comparison) A small dog with long shaggy hair, especially a poodle or spitz; a shaggy lapdog.
  • * 1827 Thomas Carlyle, The Fair-Haired Eckbert
  • When I read of witty persons, I could not figure them but like the little shock (translating the German Spitz).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook.
  • to shock rye

    Anagrams

    * ----