Ship vs Cabin - What's the difference?

ship | cabin |


As nouns the difference between ship and cabin

is that ship is a water-borne vessel generally larger than a boat or ship can be (fandom) a fictional romantic relationship between two persons, either real or themselves fictional while cabin is (lb) a small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it.

As verbs the difference between ship and cabin

is that ship is (label) to send by water-borne transport or ship can be (fandom) to write fiction that includes fictional romantic relationships between two persons, either real or themselves fictional while cabin is to place in a cabin.

ship

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) ship, schip, from (etyl) scip, from (etyl) . (cognates) Cognate with (etyl) skip, (etyl) schip, (etyl) Schiff, (etyl) .

Alternative forms

* shippe (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A water-borne vessel generally larger than a boat.
  • (chiefly, in combination) A vessel which travels through any medium other than across land, such as an airship or spaceship.
  • (archaic, nautical, formal) A sailing vessel with three or more square-rigged masts.
  • A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.
  • (Tyndale)
    Usage notes
    * The singular form (term) is sometimes used without any , producing such sentences as "In all, we spent three weeks aboard ship." and "Abandon ship!". (Similar patterns may be seen with many place nouns, such as (camp), (home), (work), and (school), but the details vary between them.) * Ships are traditionally regarded as feminine and the pronouns (her) and (she) are normally used instead of (it).
    Hyponyms
    *
    Derived terms
    * abandon ship * airship * battleship * cargo ship * coffin ship * cruise ship * escort ship * fireship * Her Majesty's Ship, His Majesty's Ship * jump ship * merchant ship * midship, midships * mother ship * sailing ship * ship ahoy! * shipboard * ship-breaker * shipbuilder * shipbuilding * ship canal * ship chandler * ship fever * shipload * shipmate * shipmaster * shipowner * ship's company * shipshape * ships that pass in the night * ship-to-shore * shipwise * shipwreck * shipwright * shipyard * sinking ship * sister ship * slave ship * spaceship * starship * tall ship * tight ship * transport ship * warship

    Verb

    (shipp)
  • (label) To send by water-borne transport.
  • * (Richard Knolles) (1545-1610)
  • The timber wasshipped in the bay of Attalia, from whence it was by sea transported to Pelusium.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. Isolating a city’s effluent and shipping it away in underground sewers has probably saved more lives than any medical procedure except vaccination.}}
  • (label) To send (a parcel or container) to a recipient (by any means of transport).
  • (label) To engage to serve on board a vessel.
  • * 1851 , (Herman Melville), (Moby-Dick) ,
  • With finger pointed and eye levelled at the Pequod, the beggar-like stranger stood a moment, as if in a troubled reverie; then starting a little, turned and said:—“Ye’ve shipped , have ye? Names down on the papers? Well, well, what’s signed, is signed; and what’s to be, will be;
  • (label) To embark on a ship.
  • To put in its place.
  • (label) To take in (water) over the sides of a vessel.
  • (label) To pass (from one person to another).
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 18, author=Ben Dirs, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Rugby World Cup 2011: England 41-10 Georgia , passage=And when scrum-half Ben Youngs, who had a poor game, was burgled by opposite number Irakli Abuseridze and the ball shipped down the line to Irakli Machkhaneli, it looked like Georgia had scored a try of their own, but the winger's foot was in touch.}}
  • To go all in.
  • (label) To trade or send a player to another team.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 1, author=Tom Fordyce, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Rugby World Cup 2011: England 16-12 Scotland , passage=England were shipping penalties at an alarming rate - five in the first 15 minutes alone - and with Wilkinson missing three long-distance pots of his own in the first 20 minutes, the alarm bells began to ring for Martin Johnson's men.}}
    Derived terms
    * shipment * shippage (rare)

    Etymology 2

    From (relationship).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (fandom) A fictional romantic relationship between two persons, either real or themselves fictional.
  • Verb

    (shipp)
  • (fandom) To write fiction that includes fictional romantic relationships between two persons, either real or themselves fictional.
  • I ship Kirk and Spock in my ''Star Trek'' fan fiction.
    See also
    * -ship

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * *

    cabin

    English

    (wikipedia cabin)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (lb) A small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it.
  • :
  • *1994 , Michael Grumley, "Life Drawing" in Violet Quill
  • *:And that was how long we stayed in the cabin , pressed together, pulling the future out of each other, sweating and groaning and making sure each of us remembered.
  • (lb) A chalet or lodge, especially one that can hold large groups of people.
  • A compartment on land, usually comprised of logs.
  • A private room on a ship.
  • :
  • *
  • *:There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. Mail bags, so I understand, are being put on board. Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors. Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place.
  • The interior of a boat, enclosed to create a small room, particularly for sleeping.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=10 , passage=Mr. Cooke had had a sloop?yacht built at Far Harbor, the completion of which had been delayed, and which was but just delivered. […] The Maria had a cabin , which was finished in hard wood and yellow plush, and accommodations for keeping things cold.}}
  • The passenger area of an airplane.
  • The section of a passenger plane having the same class of service.
  • A signal box.
  • A small room; an enclosed place.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:So long in secret cabin there he held her captive.
  • Synonyms

    * cell * chamber * hut * pod * shack * shed

    Antonyms

    * hall * palace * villa

    See also

    * cabana

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place in a cabin.
  • (obsolete) To live in, or as if in, a cabin; to lodge.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll make you cabin in a cave.