What is the difference between shift and one?

shift | one |


In context|obsolete|transitive|lang=en terms the difference between shift and one

is that shift is {{context|obsolete|transitive|lang=en}} to change (one's clothes); also to change (someone's) underclothes while one is {{context|obsolete|transitive|lang=en}} to cause to become one; to gather into a single whole; to unite.

In context|us|lang=en terms the difference between shift and one

is that shift is (us) the gear mechanism in a motor vehicle while one is (us) a one-dollar bill.

As verbs the difference between shift and one

is that shift is to change, swap while one is {{context|obsolete|transitive|lang=en}} to cause to become one; to gather into a single whole; to unite.

As nouns the difference between shift and one

is that shift is (historical) a type of women's undergarment, a slip while one is (mathematics) the neutral element with respect to multiplication in a [[ring#etymology_3|ring]].

As a numeral one is

(cardinal) a numerical value equal to [[1]]; the first number in the set of natural numbers (especially in number theory); the cardinality of the smallest nonempty set ordinal: first.

As a pronoun one is

(impersonal pronoun)  one thing (among a group of others); one member of a group.

As a adjective one is

of a period of time, being particular; as, one morning, one year.

shift

English

(wikipedia shift)

Verb

(en verb)
  • To change, swap.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-03, author=William E. Carter, Merri Sue Carter
  • , volume=100, issue=2, page=87, magazine=(American Scientist) , title= The British Longitude Act Reconsidered , passage=But was it responsible governance to pass the Longitude Act without other efforts to protect British seamen? Or might it have been subterfuge—a disingenuous attempt to shift attention away from the realities of their life at sea.}}
  • To move from one place to another; to redistribute.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them, which is then licensed to related businesses in high-tax countries, is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. […] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate […] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.}}
  • To change position.
  • (obsolete) To change (one's clothes); also to change (someone's) underclothes.
  • *, II.ii.2:
  • 'Tis very good to wash his hands and face often, to shift his clothes, to have fair linen about him, to be decently and comely attired […].
  • * Shakespeare
  • As it were to ride day and night; andnot to have patience to shift me.
  • To change gears (in a car).
  • (typewriters) To move the keys of a typewriter over in order to type capital letters and special characters.
  • (computer keyboards) To switch to a character entry mode for capital letters and special characters.
  • (computing) To manipulate a binary number by moving all of its digits left or right; compare rotate.
  • (computing) To remove the first value from an array.
  • To dispose of.
  • To hurry.
  • (Ireland, vulgar, slang) To engage in sexual petting.
  • To resort to expedients for accomplishing a purpose; to contrive; to manage.
  • * L'Estrange
  • Men in distress will look to themselves, and leave their companions to shift as well as they can.
  • To practice indirect or evasive methods.
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • All those schoolmen, though they were exceeding witty, yet better teach all their followers to shift , than to resolve by their distinctions.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (historical) a type of women's undergarment, a slip
  • Just last week she bought a new shift at the market.
  • *
  • No; without a gown, in a shift that was somewhat of the coarsest, and none of the cleanest, bedewed likewise with some odoriferous effluvia, the produce of the day's labour, with a pitchfork in her hand, Molly Seagrim approached.
  • * '>citation
  • * 1919 ,
  • Some wear black shifts and flesh-coloured stockings; some with curly hair, dyed yellow, are dressed like little girls in short muslin frocks.
  • a change of workers, now specifically a set group of workers or period of working time
  • We'll work three shifts a day till the job's done.
  • an act of shifting; a slight movement or change
  • * Sir H. Wotton
  • My going to Oxford was not merely for shift of air.
    There was a shift in the political atmosphere.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=November 7, author=Matt Bai, title=Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=The generational shift Mr. Obama once embodied is, in fact, well under way, but it will not change Washington as quickly — or as harmoniously — as a lot of voters once hoped.}}
  • (US) the gear mechanism in a motor vehicle
  • Does it come with a stick-shift ?
  • If you press shift -P, the preview display will change.
  • (computing) a bit shift
  • (baseball) The infield shift.
  • Teams often use the shift against this lefty.
  • The act of sexual petting.
  • (archaic) A contrivance, device to try when other methods fail
  • * 1596 , Shakespeare, History of King John
  • If I get down, and do not break my limbs,
    I'll find a thousand shifts to get away:
    As good to die and go, as die and stay.
  • (archaic) a trick, an artifice
  • * 1593 , Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew
  • And if the boy have not a woman's gift
    To rain a shower of commanded tears,
    An onion will do well for such a shift
  • * Macaulay
  • Reduced to pitiable shifts .
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll find a thousand shifts to get away.
  • * Dryden
  • Little souls on little shifts rely.
  • In building, the extent, or arrangement, of the overlapping of plank, brick, stones, etc., that are placed in courses so as to break joints.
  • (mining) A breaking off and dislocation of a seam; a fault.
  • Derived terms

    * blueshift * day shift * graveyard shift * make shift * night shift * preshift * shift break * shiftwork, shift work * split shift * swing shift * stickshift * redshift * (French kissing) get the shift

    one

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l) (both obsolete) * Arabic numeral: (see for numerical forms in other scripts) * Roman numeral: I

    Numeral

    (head)
  • (cardinal) A numerical value equal to ; the first number in the set of natural numbers (especially in number theory); the cardinality of the smallest nonempty set. Ordinal: first.
  • There is only one Earth.
    In many cultures, a baby turns one year old a year after its birth.
    One''' person, '''one vote.
  • *
  • Venters began to count them—one —two—three—four—on up to sixteen.
  • The ordinality of an element which has no predecessor, usually called first'' or ''number one .
  • Synonyms

    *

    See also

    *

    Pronoun

    (English Pronouns (possessive'' ''', ''plural'' ' ones )
  • (lb) One thing (among a group of others); one member of a group.
  • :
  • The first mentioned of two things or people, as opposed to the other.
  • :
  • *1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • *:Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • (lb) Any person (applying to people in general).
  • :
  • *
  • *:It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
  • *, title=The Mirror and the Lamp
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=She was a fat, round little woman, richly apparelled in velvet and lace,
  • *{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=5 citation , passage=‘It's rather like a beautiful Inverness cloak one' has inherited. Much too good to hide away, so ' one wears it instead of an overcoat and pretends it's an amusing new fashion.’}}
  • *
  • *:With fresh material, taxonomic conclusions are leavened by recognition that the material examined reflects the site it occupied; a herbarium packet gives one' only a small fraction of the data desirable for sound conclusions. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow ' one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-09-06, author=(Philip Hoare)
  • , volume=189, issue=13, page=48, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= If we're all Martians, who are the aliens? , passage=One has to admire the sheer optimism of modern science: I love the fact that there is such a discipline as astrobiology, whose practitioners' task is to imagine what life might be like on other planets. Yet here on the home planet we have profoundly strange aliens of our own.}}
  • (lb) Any person, entity or thing.
  • :
  • Synonyms

    * (unidentified person) you, they in nominative personal case.

    Derived terms

    * oneness * oneself

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (mathematics) The neutral element with respect to multiplication in a .
  • The digit or figure 1.
  • (US) A one-dollar bill.
  • (cricket) One run scored by hitting the ball and running between the wickets; a single.
  • A joke or amusing anecdote.
  • * Did you hear the one about the agnostic dyslexic insomniac?
  • (colloquial) A particularly special or compatible person or thing.
  • * I knew as soon I met him that John was the one for me and we were married within a month.
  • * That car's the one — I'll buy it.
  • * 1995 , (Bryan Adams),
  • When you love a woman then tell her
    that she's really wanted
    When you love a woman then tell her that she's the one
    'cause she needs somebody to tell her
    that it's gonna last forever
  • (Internet slang, leet, sarcastic) Used instead of to amplify an exclamation, imitating unskilled users who forget to press the shift key while typing exclamation points.
  • A: SUM1 Hl3p ME im alwyz L0ziN!!?!
    B: y d0nt u just g0 away l0zer!!1!!one'''!!'''one !!eleven!!1!
  • * 2003' September 26, "DEAL WITH IT!!!!11'''one !!", in alt.games.video.nintendo.gamecube, ''Usenet
  • * 2004' November 9, "AWK sound recorder!!!11!!11'''one ", in comp.lang.awk, ''Usenet
  • * 2007' December 1, "STANFORD!!1!!1!'''one'''!11!!1'''oneone !1!1!", in rec.sport.football.college, ''Usenet
  • Synonyms

    * unity * single * , eleven

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Of a period of time, being particular; as, one morning, one year.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=One morning I had been driven to the precarious refuge afforded by the steps of the inn, after rejecting offers from the Celebrity to join him in a variety of amusements. But even here I was not free from interruption, for he was seated on a horse-block below me, playing with a fox terrier.}}
  • Being a single, unspecified thing; a; any.
  • Sole, only.
  • Whole, entire.
  • In agreement.
  • The same.
  • Being a preeminent example.
  • Being an unknown person with the specified name.
  • Derived terms

    * all one * one and only * one-on-one * one or two * one-two * one-up * the one

    Verb

    (on)
  • (obsolete) To cause to become one; to gather into a single whole; to unite.
  • * Chaucer
  • The rich folk that embraced and oned all their heart to treasure of the world.

    Statistics

    *