Stied vs Shied - What's the difference?

stied | shied |


As verbs the difference between stied and shied

is that stied is (sty) while shied is (shy).

stied

English

Verb

(head)
  • (sty)
  • Anagrams

    *

    sty

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (sties)
  • A pen or enclosure for swine.
  • (figurative) A messy, dirty or debauched place.
  • * Milton
  • To roll with pleasure in a sensual sty .
    Synonyms
    * (enclosure for swine) pigpen, pigsty * (messy or dirty place) hovel, pigsty

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To place in, or as if in, a sty.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To live in a sty, or any messy or dirty place.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), .

    Alternative forms

    * stee, stie, stigh

    Verb

  • (label) To ascend, rise up, climb.
  • * 1395 , (John Wycliffe), Bible , Isaiah LIII:
  • And he schal stie as a ?erde bifor him, and as a roote fro Ă¾irsti lond.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , I.xi:
  • The beast impatient of his smarting wound, / And of so fierce and forcible despight, / Thought with his wings to stye aboue the ground [...].
    Derived terms
    * *

    Noun

    (sties)
  • A ladder.
  • Etymology 3

    Probably a .

    Alternative forms

    * stye

    Noun

    (sties)
  • (label) An inflammation of the eyelid.
  • shied

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (shy)
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    shy

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Easily frightened; timid.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • The horses of the army were no longer shy , but would come up to my very feet without starting.
  • Reserved; disinclined to familiar approach.
  • He is very shy with strangers.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • What makes you so shy , my good friend? There's nobody loves you better than I.
  • Cautious; wary; suspicious.
  • * Boyle
  • I am very shy of using corrosive liquors in the preparation of medicines.
  • * Sir H. Wotton
  • Princes are, by wisdom of state, somewhat shy of their successors.
  • Short, insufficient or less than.
  • By our count your shipment came up two shy of the bill of lading amount.
    It is just shy of a mile from here to their house.
  • Embarrassed.
  • See also

    * bashful * reserved * timid * demure * coy

    Usage notes

    * Often used in combination with a noun to produce an adjective or adjectival phrase. * Adjectives are usually applicable to animals (leash-shy'' "shy of leashes" or ''head shy "shy of contact around the head" (of horses)) or to children.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Antonyms

    * brazen * bold * audacious

    Derived terms

    (terms derived using shy as suffix) * -shy * bird-shy * boy-shy * car-shy * cat-shy * camera-shy * cover-shy * girl-shy * gun-shy * hand-shy * man-shy * mouse-shy * noise-shy * people-shy * water-shy * woman-shy * work-shy

    Verb

  • To avoid due to timidness or caution.
  • I shy away from investment opportunities I don't understand.
  • To jump back in fear.
  • The horse shied''' away from the rider, which startled him so much he '''shied away from the horse.
  • to throw sideways with a jerk; to fling
  • to shy''' a stone; to '''shy a slipper

    Noun

    (shies)
  • An act of throwing.
  • (Thackeray)
  • * Punch
  • If Lord Brougham gets a stone in his hand, he must, it seems, have a shy at somebody.
  • * 2008 , (James Kelman), Kieron Smith, Boy , Penguin 2009, p. 55:
  • The game had started. A man was chasing the ball, it went out for a shy .
  • A place for throwing.
  • coconut shy
  • A sudden start aside, as by a horse.
  • In the Eton College wall game, a point scored by lifting the ball against the wall in the calx.
  • Derived terms

    * coconut shy