Cool vs Shell - What's the difference?

cool | shell |


As an acronym cool

is (computing) clips object]]-oriented [[language|language .

As a proper noun shell is

a diminutive of the female given name michelle .

cool

English

Alternative forms

* (slang) coo, kewl, kool, qewl, qool

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . Related to (l).

Adjective

(er)
  • Having a slightly low temperature; mildly or pleasantly cold.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The day was cool and snappy for August, and the Rise all green with a lavish nature. Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet:
  • Allowing or suggesting heat relief.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • Of a person, not showing emotion, calm and in self-control.
  • Unenthusiastic, lukewarm, skeptical.
  • Calmly audacious.
  • * (Nathaniel Hawthorne) (1804-1864)
  • Its cool stare of familiarity was intolerable.
  • * 1944 November 28, Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoffe, Meet Me in St. Louis , Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer:
  • My father was talking to the World's Fair Commission yesterday, and they estimate it's going to cost a cool fifty million.
  • (label) Of a person, knowing what to do and how to behave; considered popular by others.
  • (label) In fashion, part of or fitting the in crowd; originally hipster slang.
  • * 2008 , Lou Schuler, "Foreward", in'' Nate Green, ''Built for Show , page xii
  • The fact that I was middle-aged, bald, married, and raising girls instead of chasing them didn't really bother me. Muscles are cool at any age.
  • (label) Of an action, all right; acceptable; that does not present a problem.
  • (label) A dismissal of a comment perceived as boring or pointless.
  • (label) Of a person, not upset by circumstances that might ordinarily be upsetting.
  • * (Henry Fielding) (1707-1754)
  • He had lost a cool hundred.
  • * (Charles Dickens) (1812-1870)
  • leaving a cool four thousand to Mr. Matthew Pocket
    Synonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) chilly * (not showing emotion) distant, phlegmatic, standoffish, unemotional * (in fashion) ** (standard) , fashionable, in fashion, modish, stylish ** (colloquial or slang) happening, hip, in, trendy * (acceptable) acceptable, all right, OK * (not upset) easy, fine, not bothered, not fussed'''
    Antonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) lukewarm, tepid, warm * (not showing emotion) passionate * (knowing what to do and how to behave) awkward, uncool * (in fashion) , old hat, out, out of fashion * (acceptable) not cricket (UK), not on, unacceptable * (not upset) bothered, upset * (unenthusiastic) warm
    Derived terms
    * cool head * coolish * coolly * coolness * keep one's cool * lose one's cool * uncool
    Quotations
    * The earliest use of the word in this way seems to be in ' "The Moonstone" 1868: *: "She has been a guest of yours at this house," I answered. "May I venture to suggest — if nothing was said about me beforehand — that I might see her here?" *: "Cool!" said Mr. Bruff. With that one word of comment on the reply that I had made to him, he took another turn up and down the room. *: "In plain English," he said, "my house is to be turned into a trap to catch Rachel ... * In 1602, Shakespeare wrote that Queen Gertrude told Hamlet: *: "O gentle son, Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper, Sprinkle cool patience."

    Noun

    (-)
  • A moderate or refreshing state of cold; moderate temperature of the air between hot and cold; coolness.
  • in the cool of the morning
  • A calm temperament.
  • Synonyms
    *(calm temperament) calmness, composure

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) colen, from (etyl) , altered to resemble the adjective cool. See (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (literally) To lose heat, to get colder.
  • I like to let my tea cool before drinking it so I don't burn my tongue.
  • To make cooler, less warm.
  • * Bible, Luke xvi. 24:
  • Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue.
  • (figuratively) To become less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • Relations cooled between the USA and the USSR after 1980.
  • To make less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • * Shakespeare:
  • We have reason to cool our raging motions, our carnal stings, our unbitted lusts.
    Derived terms
    * coolant * cooler * cooling * cool off * cool down * cool it * cool one's heels * cool one's jets

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    shell

    English

    (wikipedia shell)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hard external covering of an animal.
  • # The calcareous or chitinous external covering of mollusks, crustaceans, and some other invertebrates.
  • In some mollusks, as the cuttlefish, the shell is concealed by the animal's outer mantle and is considered internal.
  • Genuine mother of pearl buttons are made from sea shells .
  • # (by extension) Any mollusk having such a covering.
  • # (entomology) The exoskeleton or wing covers of certain insects.
  • # The conjoined scutes that comprise the "shell" (carapace) of a tortoise or turtle.
  • # The overlapping hard plates comprising the armor covering the armadillo's body.
  • The hard calcareous covering of a bird egg.
  • The hard external covering of various plant seed forms.
  • # The covering, or outside part, of a nut.
  • The black walnut and the hickory nut, both of the same ''Genus as the pecan, have much thicker and harder shells than the pecan.
  • # A pod containing the seeds of certain plants, such as the legume Phaseolus vulgaris .
  • # (in the plural) Husks of cacao seeds, a decoction of which is sometimes used as a substitute or adulterant for cocoa and its products such as chocolate.
  • The accreted mineral formed around a hollow geode.
  • The casing of a self-contained single-unit artillery projectile.
  • A hollow usually spherical or cylindrical projectile fired from a siege mortar or a smoothbore cannon. It contains an explosive substance designed to be ignited by a fuse or by percussion at the target site so that it will burst and scattered at high velocity its contents and fragments. Formerly called a bomb.
  • The cartridge of a breechloading firearm; a load; a bullet; a round.
  • Any slight hollow structure; a framework, or exterior structure, regarded as not complete or filled in, as the shell of a house.
  • A garment, usually worn by women, such as a shirt, blouse, or top, with short sleeves or no sleeves, that often fastens in the rear.
  • A coarse or flimsy coffin; a thin interior coffin enclosed within a more substantial one.
  • (Knight)
  • (music) A string instrument, as a lyre, whose acoustical chamber is formed like a shell.
  • The first lyre may have been made by drawing strings over the underside of a tortoise shell.
  • * Dryden
  • when Jubal struck the chorded shell
  • (music) The body of a drum; the often wooden, often cylindrical acoustic chamber, with or without rims added for tuning and for attaching the drum head.
  • An engraved copper roller used in print works.
  • (nautical) The watertight outer covering of the hull of a vessel, often made with planking or metal plating.
  • (nautical, rigging) The outer frame or case of a block within which the sheaves revolve.
  • (nautical) A light boat the frame of which is covered with thin wood, impermeable fabric, or water-proofed paper; a racing shell or dragon boat.
  • (computing) An operating system software user interface, whose primary purpose is to launch other programs and control their interactions; the user's command interpreter.
  • The name shell originates from it being viewed as an outer layer of interface between the user and the internals of the operating system.
    The name "Bash" is an acronym which stands for "Bourne-again shell", itself a pun on the name of the "Bourne shell", an earlier Unix shell designed by Stephen Bourne, and the Christian concept of being "born again".
  • (chemistry) A set of atomic orbitals that have the same principal quantum number.
  • An emaciated person.
  • He's lost so much weight from illness; he's a shell of his former self.
  • A psychological barrier to social interaction.
  • Even after months of therapy he's still in his shell .
  • (business) A legal entity that has no operations.
  • A shell corporation was formed to acquire the old factory.

    Derived terms

    * clamshell * clean shell * come out of one’s shell * eggshell * seashell * shellfish * shell script * shell suit * tortoiseshell

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove the outer covering or shell of something. See sheller.
  • To bombard, to fire projectiles at, especially with artillery.
  • (informal) To disburse or give up money, to pay. (Often used with out ).
  • To fall off, as a shell, crust, etc.
  • To cast the shell, or exterior covering; to fall out of the pod or husk.
  • Nuts shell in falling.
    Wheat or rye shells in reaping.
  • (computing) To switch to a shell or command line.
  • * 1993 , Robin Nixon, The PC Companion (page 115)
  • Automenu is a good program to try, and offers a fair amount of protection - but, unfortunately, it's one of those systems that allow users to shell to DOS.

    Derived terms

    * shell out

    Anagrams

    * hells