Sheet vs Shear - What's the difference?

sheet | shear |


In geology|lang=en terms the difference between sheet and shear

is that sheet is (geology) an extensive bed of an eruptive rock intruded between, or overlying, other strata while shear is (geology) the response of a rock to deformation usually by compressive stress, resulting in particular textures.

As nouns the difference between sheet and shear

is that sheet is a thin bed cloth used as a covering for a mattress or as a layer over the sleeper while shear is a cutting tool similar to scissors, but often larger.

As verbs the difference between sheet and shear

is that sheet is to cover or wrap with cloth, or paper, or other similar material while shear is to cut, originally with a sword or other bladed weapon, now usually with shears, or as if using shears.

As an adjective shear is

.

sheet

English

(wikipedia sheet)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A thin bed cloth used as a covering for a mattress or as a layer over the sleeper.
  • * Use the sheets in the hall closet to make the bed.
  • * Bible, Acts x. 10, 11
  • He fell into a trance, and saw heaven opened, and a certain vessel descending unto him, as it had been a great sheet knit at the four corners.
  • * Shakespeare
  • If I do die before thee, prithee, shroud me / In one of those same sheets .
  • A piece of paper, usually rectangular, that has been prepared for writing, artwork, drafting, wrapping, manufacture of packaging (boxes, envelopes, etc.), and for other uses. The word does not include scraps and irregular small pieces destined to be recycled, used for stuffing or cushioning or paper mache, etc.
  • * A sheet of paper measuring eight and one-half inches wide by eleven inches high is a popular item in commerce.
  • * Paper is designated “20 pound” if a stack (ream) of 500 sheets 22 inches by 17 inches weighs 20 pounds.
  • A flat metal pan, often without raised edge, used for baking.
  • * Place the rolls on the cookie sheet , edges touching, and bake for 10-11 minutes.
  • A thin, flat layer of solid material.
  • * The glazer cut several panes from a large sheet of glass.
  • * A sheet''' of that new silicon stuff is as good as a '''sheet of tinfoil to keep food from sticking in the baking pan.
  • A broad, flat expanse of a material on a surface.
  • * Mud froze on the road in a solid sheet''', then more rain froze into a '''sheet of ice on top of the mud!
  • (nautical) A line (rope) used to adjust the trim of a sail.
  • * To be "three sheets to the wind" is to say that a four-cornered sail is tethered only by one sheet and thus the sail is useless.
  • (nautical, nonstandard) A sail.
  • (Dryden)
  • (curling) The area of ice on which the game of curling is played.
  • (nonstandard) A layer of veneer.
  • (figuratively) Precipitation of such quantity and force as to resemble a thin, virtually solid wall.
  • (geology) An extensive bed of an eruptive rock intruded between, or overlying, other strata.
  • (nautical) The space in the forward or after part of a boat where there are no rowers.
  • fore sheets'''; stern '''sheets

    Synonyms

    * (piece of paper) page * (line) rope * (expanse of material) layer, coat, coating, blanket

    Derived terms

    * balance sheet * bedsheet * bleed-sheet * broadsheet * cap sheet * clean sheet * contour sheet * dope sheet * fitted sheet * scandal sheet * scratch sheet * sheet music * stylesheet * tearsheet * three sheets to the wind * tip sheet * top sheet * under the sheets * white as a sheet * worksheet * yellow sheet

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cover or wrap with cloth, or paper, or other similar material.
  • Remember to sheet the floor before you start painting.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Yea, like a stag, when snow the pasture sheets , / The barks of trees thou browsed'st.
  • Of rain, or other precipitation, to pour heavily.
  • We couldn't go out because the rain was sheeting down all day long.
  • (nautical) To trim a sail using a sheet.
  • References

    *

    Anagrams

    * * * 1000 English basic words

    shear

    English

    (wikipedia shear)

    Verb

  • To cut, originally with a sword or other bladed weapon, now usually with shears, or as if using shears.
  • * 1819 , Walter Scott, Ivanhoe :
  • So trenchant was the Templar’s weapon, that it shore asunder, as it had been a willow twig, the tough and plaited handle of the mace, which the ill-fated Saxon reared to parry the blow, and, descending on his head, levelled him with the earth.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the golden tresses were shorn away
  • To remove the fleece from a sheep etc by clipping.
  • (physics) To deform because of shearing forces.
  • (Scotland) To reap, as grain.
  • (Jamieson)
  • (figurative) To deprive of property; to fleece.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • a cutting tool similar to scissors, but often larger
  • * Dryden
  • short of the wool, and naked from the shear
  • the act of shearing, or something removed by shearing
  • * Youatt
  • After the second shearing, he is a two-shear' ram; at the expiration of another year, he is a three-' shear ram; the name always taking its date from the time of shearing.
  • (physics) a force that produces a shearing strain
  • (geology) The response of a rock to deformation usually by compressive stress, resulting in particular textures.
  • Derived terms

    * megashear * shearer

    Adjective

    (head)