Stage vs Shape - What's the difference?

stage | shape |


As nouns the difference between stage and shape

is that stage is a phase while shape is the status or condition of something.

As verbs the difference between stage and shape

is that stage is to produce on a stage, to perform a play while shape is to give something a shape and definition.

stage

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A phase.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.}}
  • The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage .
  • * (1791–1875)
  • Lo! Where the stage , the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
  • A floor or storey of a house.
  • (Wyclif)
  • A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  • A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  • A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
  • * (William Cowper) (1731-1800)
  • a parcel sent you by the stage
  • * (Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • I went in the sixpenny stage .
  • (label) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  • (label) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
  • * Jeffrey
  • A stage signifies a certain distance on a road.
  • * 1858 , (Samuel Smiles), (Robert Stephenson), The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer , p.356
  • He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages .
  • *{{quote-book, year=1910, author=(Emerson Hough)
  • , title= The Purchase Price, chapter=3 , passage=The Mount Vernon , favoured by a good stage of water, soon cleared the narrow Monongahela channel, passed the confluence, and headed down under full steam, […].}}
  • (label) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  • The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
  • (label) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
  • A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Music and ethereal mirth / Wherewith the stage of air and earth did ring.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.}}

    Synonyms

    * (phase) tier, level

    Derived terms

    * sage on the stage * stagecoach * stage-door Johnny * stage whisper * staging area

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
  • The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  • To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
  • The salesman’s demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  • (Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
  • To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.
  • We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    shape

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The status or condition of something
  • The used bookshop wouldn't offer much due to the poor shape of the book.
  • Condition of personal health, especially muscular health.
  • The vet checked to see what kind of shape the animal was in.
    We exercise to keep in good physical shape .
  • The appearance of something, especially its outline.
  • He cut a square shape out of the cake.
  • A figure with unspecified appearance; especially a geometric figure.
  • What shape shall we use for the cookies? Stars, circles, or diamonds?
  • Form; formation.
  • * 2006 , Berdj Kenadjian, Martin Zakarian, From Darkness to Light :
  • What if God's plans and actions do mold the shape of human events?
  • (iron manufacture) A rolled or hammered piece, such as a bar, beam, angle iron, etc., having a cross section different from merchant bar.
  • (iron manufacture) A piece which has been roughly forged nearly to the form it will receive when completely forged or fitted.
  • A mould for making jelly, blancmange etc., or a piece of such food formed moulded into a particular shape.
  • *1918 , (Rebecca West), The Return of the Soldier , Virago 2014, p. 74:
  • *:‘And if I'm late for supper there's a dish of macaroni cheese you must put in the oven and a tin of tomatoes to eat with it. And there's a little rhubarb and shape .’
  • Hyponyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * contest shape * * in no shape to * * in shape * out of shape * shapeless * shapely * shapesmith * shape-shifter * shape-shifting * shipshape * take shape * the shape of things to come * whip into shape

    See also

    *

    Verb

  • To give something a shape and definition.
  • * 1932 , The American Scholar , page 227, United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa
  • The professor never pretended to the academic prerogative of forcing his students into his own channels of reasoning; he entered into and helped shape the discussion but above all he made his men learn to think for themselves and rely upon their own intellectual judgments.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Revenge of the nerds , passage=Think of banking today and the image is of grey-suited men in towering skyscrapers. Its future, however, is being shaped in converted warehouses and funky offices in San Francisco, New York and London, where bright young things in jeans and T-shirts huddle around laptops, sipping lattes or munching on free food.}}
  • To form or manipulate something into a certain shape.
  • * Prior
  • Grace shaped her limbs, and beauty decked her face.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2010, date=December 29, author=Mark Vesty, work=BBC
  • , title= Wigan 2-2 Arsenal , passage=Bendtner's goal-bound shot was well saved by goalkeeper Ali Al Habsi but fell to Arsahvin on the edge of the area and the Russian swivelled, shaped his body and angled a sumptuous volley into the corner. }}
  • (of a country, person, etc) To give influence to.
  • To suit; to be adjusted or conformable.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To imagine; to conceive.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Oft my jealousy / Shapes faults that are not.

    Synonyms

    * (give shape) form, mold

    Derived terms

    * beshape * foreshape * forshape * misshape * overshape * shape up

    Anagrams

    * * * 1000 English basic words