Shacked vs Shanked - What's the difference?

shacked | shanked |


As verbs the difference between shacked and shanked

is that shacked is (shack) while shanked is (shank).

As an adjective shanked is

having a shank.

shacked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (shack)

  • shack

    English

    (wikipedia shack)

    Etymology 1

    Some authorities derive this word from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A crude, roughly built hut or cabin.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , title=Lord Stranleigh Abroad , chapter=6 citation , passage=The men resided in a huge bunk house, which consisted of one room only, with a shack outside where the cooking was done. In the large room were a dozen bunks?; half of them in a very dishevelled state, […]}}
  • Any unpleasant, poorly constructed or poorly furnished building.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To live in or with; to shack up.
  • Etymology 2

    Obsolete variant of shake. Compare (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.
  • (obsolete) Nuts which have fallen to the ground.
  • (obsolete) Freedom to pasturage in order to feed upon shack .
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • [...] first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • * 1996, J M Neeson, Commoners [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=ISBN0521567742&id=2CqhjjiwLtEC&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&sig=3geUREguU3vTYj_05PtAfzFODDA]
  • The fields were enclosed by Act in 1791, and Tharp gave the cottagers about thirteen acres for their right of shack .
  • (UK, US, dialect, obsolete) A shiftless fellow; a low, itinerant beggar; a vagabond; a tramp.
  • (Forby)
  • * Henry Ward Beecher
  • All the poor old shacks about the town found a friend in Deacon Marble.
    Derived terms
    * common of shack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.
  • (obsolete) To feed in stubble, or upon waste.
  • (Grose)
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • (UK, dialect) To wander as a vagabond or tramp.
  • Anagrams

    *

    References

    shanked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (shank)
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • Having a shank.

  • shank

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (slang) Bad.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • The part of the leg between the knee and the ankle.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide / For his shrunk shank .
  • Meat from that part of an animal.
  • A straight, narrow part of an object, such as a key or an anchor; shaft; stem.
  • The handle of a pair of shears, connecting the ride to the neck.
  • The center part of a fishhook between the eye and the hook, the 'hook' being the curved part that bends toward the point.
  • A protruding part of an object, by which it is or can be attached.
  • The metal part on a curb bit that falls below the mouthpiece of the bit, which length controls the severity of the leverage action of the bit, and to which the reins of the bridle are attached.
  • (sports) A poorly played golf shot in which the ball is struck by the part of the club head that connects to the shaft. See thin,fat,toe.
  • (slang) An improvised stabbing weapon.
  • Any of several species of Old World wading bird in the genus Tringa that are primarily distinguished by their brightly colored legs.
  • A loop forming an eye to a button.
  • (architecture) The space between two channels of the Doric triglyph.
  • (Gwilt)
  • (metalworking) A large ladle for molten metal, fitted with long bars for handling it.
  • (printing, dated) The body of a type.
  • (shoemaking) The part of the sole beneath the instep connecting the broader front part with the heel.
  • Flat-nosed pliers, used by opticians for nipping off the edges of pieces of glass to make them round.
  • Derived terms

    * greenshank * umbroshank * redshank * shank-nag * shank-weary * shankbone - the bone of the foreleg * shanks' nag * shanks' mare * shanks' pony * Longshanks

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic, Ulster) to travel on foot
  • (slang) to stab, especially with an improvised blade
  • (slang) to remove another's pants, especially in jest; to depants
  • (transitive, chiefly, golf, football) to hit or kick the ball in an unintended direction
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 28 , author=Tom Rostance , title=Arsenal 2 - 1 Olympiakos , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Marouane Chamakh then spurned a great chance to kill the game off when he ran onto Andrey Arshavin's lofted through ball but shanked his shot horribly across the face of goal.}}
  • To fall off, as a leaf, flower, or capsule, on account of disease affecting the supporting footstalk; usually followed by off.
  • (Darwin)

    Anagrams

    *