Handle vs Shank - What's the difference?

handle | shank | Synonyms |

Handle is a synonym of shank.


In lang=en terms the difference between handle and shank

is that handle is to use the hands while shank is to fall off, as a leaf, flower, or capsule, on account of disease affecting the supporting footstalk; usually followed by off.

In slang|lang=en terms the difference between handle and shank

is that handle is (slang) a name, nickname or pseudonym while shank is (slang) to remove another's pants, especially in jest; to depants.

As nouns the difference between handle and shank

is that handle is a part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc or handle can be (slang) a name, nickname or pseudonym while shank is the part of the leg between the knee and the ankle.

As verbs the difference between handle and shank

is that handle is to use the hands while shank is (archaic|ulster) to travel on foot.

As an adjective shank is

(slang) bad.

handle

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) handel, handle, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc.
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  • That of which use is made; an instrument for effecting a purpose (either literally or figuratively); a tool.
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  • (Australia, New Zealand) A 10 fl oz (285 ml) glass of beer in the Northern Territory. See also pot, middy for other regional variations.
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  • (American) A half-gallon (1.75-liter) bottle of alcohol.
  • (computing) A reference to an object or structure that can be stored in a variable.
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  • This article describes how to find the module name from the window handle .
  • (gambling) The gross amount of wagering within a given period of time or for a given event at one of more establishments.
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  • The daily handle of a Las Vegas casino is typically millions of dollars.
  • (geography, Newfoundland, and, Labrador, rare) A point, an extremity of land.
  • Handle of the Sug, Nfld.
  • (textiles) The tactile qualities of a fabric, e.g., softness, firmness, elasticity, fineness, resilience, and other qualities perceived by touch.
  • (topology) A topological space homeomorphic to a ball but viewed as a product of two lower-dimensional balls.
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  • Derived terms
    * give a handle * handlebar, handlebars * handlebody * handleless * handling * love handle

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) handlen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To use the hands.
  • * Psalm 115:7:
  • They [idols made of gold and silver] have hands, but they handle not
  • To touch; to feel with the hand.
  • * Luke 24:39:
  • Handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh.
  • To use or hold with the hand.
  • * :
  • About his altar, handling holy things
  • To manage in using, as a spade or a musket; to wield; often, to manage skillfully.
  • * Shakespeare, King Lear , IV-vi:
  • That fellow handles his bow like a crowkeeper
  • To accustom to the hand; to work upon, or take care of, with the hands.
  • * Sir W. Temple:
  • The hardness of the winters forces the breeders to house and handle their colts six months every year
  • To receive and transfer; to have pass through one's hands; hence, to buy and sell
  • a merchant handles a variety of goods, or a large stock
  • To deal with; to make a business of.
  • * Jeremiah, 2:8:
  • They that handle the law knew me not
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 16 , author=Denis Campbell , title=Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients' , work=Guardian citation , page= , passage=The findings emerged from questionnaires filled in by 2,211 staff in 145 wards of 55 hospitals in England and Wales and 105 observations of care of dementia patients. Two-thirds of staff said they had not had enough training to provide proper care, 50% said they had not been trained how to communicate properly with such patients and 54% had not been told how to handle challenging or aggressive behaviour.}}
  • To treat; to use, well or ill.
  • * Shakespeare, Henry VI , Part I, I-iv:
  • How wert thou handled being prisoner
  • To manage; to control; to practice skill upon.
  • * Shakespeare, Measure for Measure , V-i:
  • You shall see how I'll handle her
  • To use or manage in writing or speaking; to treat, as a theme, an argument, or an objection.
  • * :
  • We will handle what persons are apt to envy others
  • (soccer) To touch the ball with the hand or arm; to commit handball.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=February 12 , author=Les Roopanarine , title=Birmingham 1 - 0 Stoke , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Robert Huth handled a Bentley shot, only for the offence to go unnoticed.}}
    Synonyms
    * feel * finger * touch * deal * manage * treat
    Derived terms
    * to handle without gloves: (colloquial) See under glove * mishandle

    Etymology 3

    Originally Cornish-American, from (etyl) , later hanow (pronounced han'of'' or ''han'o ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (slang) A name, nickname or pseudonym.
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  • shank

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (slang) Bad.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • The part of the leg between the knee and the ankle.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide / For his shrunk shank .
  • Meat from that part of an animal.
  • A straight, narrow part of an object, such as a key or an anchor; shaft; stem.
  • The handle of a pair of shears, connecting the ride to the neck.
  • The center part of a fishhook between the eye and the hook, the 'hook' being the curved part that bends toward the point.
  • A protruding part of an object, by which it is or can be attached.
  • The metal part on a curb bit that falls below the mouthpiece of the bit, which length controls the severity of the leverage action of the bit, and to which the reins of the bridle are attached.
  • (sports) A poorly played golf shot in which the ball is struck by the part of the club head that connects to the shaft. See thin,fat,toe.
  • (slang) An improvised stabbing weapon.
  • Any of several species of Old World wading bird in the genus Tringa that are primarily distinguished by their brightly colored legs.
  • A loop forming an eye to a button.
  • (architecture) The space between two channels of the Doric triglyph.
  • (Gwilt)
  • (metalworking) A large ladle for molten metal, fitted with long bars for handling it.
  • (printing, dated) The body of a type.
  • (shoemaking) The part of the sole beneath the instep connecting the broader front part with the heel.
  • Flat-nosed pliers, used by opticians for nipping off the edges of pieces of glass to make them round.
  • Derived terms

    * greenshank * umbroshank * redshank * shank-nag * shank-weary * shankbone - the bone of the foreleg * shanks' nag * shanks' mare * shanks' pony * Longshanks

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic, Ulster) to travel on foot
  • (slang) to stab, especially with an improvised blade
  • (slang) to remove another's pants, especially in jest; to depants
  • (transitive, chiefly, golf, football) to hit or kick the ball in an unintended direction
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 28 , author=Tom Rostance , title=Arsenal 2 - 1 Olympiakos , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Marouane Chamakh then spurned a great chance to kill the game off when he ran onto Andrey Arshavin's lofted through ball but shanked his shot horribly across the face of goal.}}
  • To fall off, as a leaf, flower, or capsule, on account of disease affecting the supporting footstalk; usually followed by off.
  • (Darwin)

    Anagrams

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