Low vs Shame - What's the difference?

low | shame |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between low and shame

is that low is (archaic) not rich, highly seasoned, or nourishing; plain; simple while shame is (archaic) that which is shameful and private, especially body parts.

As nouns the difference between low and shame

is that low is something that is low; a low point or low can be (countable|uk|scotland|dialect) a flame; fire; blaze or low can be , mound, tumulus while shame is uncomfortable]] or painful feeling due to recognition or consciousness of impropriety, dishonor or other wrong in the opinion of the person experiencing the feeling it is caused by awareness of exposure of circumstances of [[unworthy|unworthiness or of improper or indecent conduct.

As verbs the difference between low and shame

is that low is (obsolete|transitive) to depress; to lower or low can be or low can be to moo or low can be (uk|scotland|dialect) to burn; to blaze while shame is to feel shame, be ashamed.

As an adjective low

is in a position comparatively close to the ground.

As an adverb low

is close to the ground.

As an interjection shame is

a cry of admonition for the subject of a speech, often used reduplicated, especially in political debates.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

low

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) lowe, lohe, . More at lie.

Adjective

(er)
  • In a position comparatively close to the ground.
  • Small in height.
  • Situated below the normal level, or the mean elevation.
  • Depressed, sad.
  • low spirits
    I felt low at Christmas with no family to celebrate with.
  • Not high in amount or quantity.
  • Food prices are lower in a supermarket than in a luxury department store.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=The ability to shift profits to low -tax countries by locating intellectual property in them, which is then licensed to related businesses in high-tax countries, is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. […] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate […] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.}}
  • Of a pitch, suggesting a lower frequency.
  • Quiet; soft; not loud.
  • Despicable; lacking dignity; vulgar.
  • a person of low mind
    a low trick or stratagem
  • Lacking health or vitality; feeble; weak.
  • a low pulse
    made low by sickness
  • Being near the equator.
  • the low northern latitudes
  • Humble in character or status.
  • * Milton
  • Why but to keep ye low and ignorant?
  • * Felton
  • In comparison of these divine writers, the noblest wits of the heathen world are low and dull.
  • Simple in complexity or development.
  • Designed for the slowest speed, as in low gear .
  • Articulated with a wide space between the flat tongue and the palette.
  • (phonetics) Made, as a vowel, with a low position of part of the tongue in relation to the palate.
  • (archaic) Not rich, highly seasoned, or nourishing; plain; simple.
  • a low diet
    Synonyms
    * (in a position comparatively close to the ground) nether, underslung * (small in height) short, small * (depressed) blue, depressed, down, miserable, sad, unhappy, gloomy * reduced, devalued, low-level * low-pitched, deep, flat * low-toned, soft * (despicable thing to do) immoral, abject, scummy, scurvy
    Antonyms
    * (in a position comparatively close to the ground) high
    Derived terms
    * high and low * lowball * low blow * low bridge * low-budget * low-cost * Low Countries * low-cut * lower * lowercase * low-fat * Low German * low-grade * low island * lowland * Low Latin * low-level * low loader * lowly * low-lying * low road * low tide

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something that is low; a low point.
  • You have achieved a new low in behavior, Frank.
    ''Economic growth has hit a new low .
  • A depressed mood or situation.
  • He is in a low right now
  • (meteorology) An area of low pressure; a depression.
  • The lowest-speed gearing of a power-transmission system, especially of an automotive vehicle.
  • Shift out of low before the car gets to eight miles per hour.
  • (card games) The lowest trump, usually the deuce; the lowest trump dealt or drawn.
  • (slang) (usually accompanied by "the") a cheap, cost-efficient, or advantageous payment or expense.
  • He got the brand new Yankees jersey for the low .

    Adverb

    (er)
  • Close to the ground.
  • Of a pitch, at a lower frequency.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Can sing both high and low .
  • With a low voice or sound; not loudly; gently.
  • to speak low
  • * Tennyson
  • The odorous wind / Breathes low between the sunset and the moon.
  • Under the usual price; at a moderate price; cheaply.
  • He sold his wheat low .
  • In a low mean condition; humbly; meanly.
  • * '>citation
  • In a time approaching our own.
  • * John Locke
  • In that part of the world which was first inhabited, even as low down as Abraham's time, they wandered with their flocks and herds.
  • (astronomy) In a path near the equator, so that the declination is small, or near the horizon, so that the altitude is small; said of the heavenly bodies with reference to the diurnal revolution.
  • The moon runs low , i.e. comparatively near the horizon when on or near the meridian.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To depress; to lower.
  • (Jonathan Swift)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) . More at laugh.

    Verb

    (head)
  • .
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) . More at claim.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To moo.
  • The cattle were lowing .
  • * Gray
  • The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea.

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) lowe, loghe, from (etyl) . More at leye, light.

    Alternative forms

    * lowe

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable, UK, Scotland, dialect) A flame; fire; blaze.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) To burn; to blaze.
  • (Burns)

    Etymology 5

    From (etyl) . Obsolete by the 19th century, survives in toponymy as -low.

    Alternative forms

    * lawe

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • , mound, tumulus.
  • A barrow or Low, such as were usually cast up over the bodies of eminent Captains.'' (Robert Plot, ''The natural history of Staffordshire , 1686; cited after OED).
  • (Scottish dialectal, archaic) A hill.
  • And some they brought the brown lint-seed, and flung it down from the Low.'' (Mary Howitt, ''Ballads and other poems 1847)

    Statistics

    *

    shame

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) , which may also be the source of heaven; see that entry for details. Compare also Persian .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Uncomfortable]] or painful feeling due to recognition or consciousness of impropriety, dishonor or other wrong in the opinion of the person experiencing the feeling. It is caused by awareness of exposure of circumstances of [[unworthy, unworthiness or of improper or indecent conduct.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Have you no modesty, no maiden shame ?
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=When this conversation was repeated in detail within the hearing of the young woman in question, and undoubtedly for his benefit, Mr. Trevor threw shame to the winds and scandalized the Misses Brewster then and there by proclaiming his father to have been a country storekeeper.}}
  • Something to regret.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • guides who are the shame of religion
  • * Evelyn "Champagne" King, in the song Shame
  • And what you do to me is a shame .
  • Reproach incurred or suffered; dishonour; ignominy; derision.
  • * Bible, (Ezekiel) xxxvi. 6
  • Ye have borne the shame of the heathen.
  • * (Alexander Pope)
  • Honour and shame from no condition rise.
  • * (Lord Byron)
  • And every woe a tear can claim / Except an erring sister's shame .
  • The cause or reason of shame; that which brings reproach and ignominy.
  • * Shakespeare
  • guides who are the shame of religion
  • (archaic) That which is shameful and private, especially body parts.
  • Cover your shame !
    Usage notes
    * While shame is not generally counted, it is countable, for example *: I felt two shames: one for hurting my friend, and a greater one for lying about it.
    Synonyms
    * (something regrettable) pity
    Derived terms
    * body shame * crying shame * shame on you * shamefaced * shameful * shamefully * shameless * shamelessly

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • A cry of admonition for the subject of a speech, often used reduplicated, especially in political debates.
  • * 1982 , " Telecommunications Bill", Hansard
  • Mr John Golding: One would not realise that it came from the same Government, because in that letter the Under-Secretary states: "The future of BT's pension scheme is a commercial matter between BT, its workforce, and the trustees of the pensions scheme, and the Government cannot give any guarantees about future pension arrangements."
    Mr. Charles R. Morris': ' Shame .
  • * 1831 , The Bristol Job Nott; or, Labouring Man's Friend
  • [...] the Duke of Dorset charged in the list with "not known, but supposed forty thousand per year''" (charitable supposition) had when formerly in office only about 3 or £4,000, and ''has not now, nor when the black list was printed, any office whatever -- (Much tumult, and cries of "shame " and "doust the liars")
  • (South Africa) Expressing sympathy.
  • Shame , you poor thing, you must be cold!
    Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) scamian.

    Verb

    (sham)
  • To feel shame, be ashamed.
  • *:
  • *:Broder she said I can not telle yow For it was not done by me nor by myn assente / For he is my lord and I am his / and he must be myn husband / therfore my broder I wille that ye wete I shame me not to be with hym / nor to doo hym alle the pleasyr that I can
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I do shame / To think of what a noble strain you are.
  • (label) To cause to feel shame.
  • :I was shamed by the teacher's public disapproval.
  • *(Robert South) (1634–1716)
  • *:Were there but one righteous in the world, he wouldshame the world, and not the world him.
  • To cover with reproach or ignominy; to dishonour; to disgrace.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:And with foul cowardice his carcass shame .
  • (label) To mock at; to deride.
  • *
  • *:Ye have shamed the counsel of the poor, because the LORD is his refuge.
  • Derived terms
    * ashamed

    References

    *

    Anagrams

    *