Barracks vs Shack - What's the difference?

barracks | shack |


As nouns the difference between barracks and shack

is that barracks is while shack is a crude, roughly built hut or cabin or shack can be (obsolete) grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.

As verbs the difference between barracks and shack

is that barracks is (barrack) while shack is to live in or with; to shack up or shack can be (obsolete) to shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.

barracks

Noun

(head)
  • A group of buildings used by military personnel as housing
  • Verb

    (head)
  • (barrack)
  • shack

    English

    (wikipedia shack)

    Etymology 1

    Some authorities derive this word from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A crude, roughly built hut or cabin.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , title=Lord Stranleigh Abroad , chapter=6 citation , passage=The men resided in a huge bunk house, which consisted of one room only, with a shack outside where the cooking was done. In the large room were a dozen bunks?; half of them in a very dishevelled state, […]}}
  • Any unpleasant, poorly constructed or poorly furnished building.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To live in or with; to shack up.
  • Etymology 2

    Obsolete variant of shake. Compare (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Grain fallen to the ground and left after harvest.
  • (obsolete) Nuts which have fallen to the ground.
  • (obsolete) Freedom to pasturage in order to feed upon shack .
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • [...] first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • * 1996, J M Neeson, Commoners [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=ISBN0521567742&id=2CqhjjiwLtEC&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&sig=3geUREguU3vTYj_05PtAfzFODDA]
  • The fields were enclosed by Act in 1791, and Tharp gave the cottagers about thirteen acres for their right of shack .
  • (UK, US, dialect, obsolete) A shiftless fellow; a low, itinerant beggar; a vagabond; a tramp.
  • (Forby)
  • * Henry Ward Beecher
  • All the poor old shacks about the town found a friend in Deacon Marble.
    Derived terms
    * common of shack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.
  • (obsolete) To feed in stubble, or upon waste.
  • (Grose)
  • * 1918, Christobel Mary Hoare Hood, The History of an East Anglian Soke [http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&vid=OCLC11859773&id=rI0iE-yqyAMC&q=%22right+to+shack%22&prev=http://books.google.com/books%3Flr%3D%26q%3D%2522right%2Bto%2Bshack%2522&pgis=1]
  • first comes the case of tenants with a customary right to shack their sheep and cattle who have overburdened the fields with a larger number of beasts than their tenement entitles them to, or who have allowed their beasts to feed in the field out of shack time.
  • (UK, dialect) To wander as a vagabond or tramp.
  • Anagrams

    *

    References