Strengthen vs Settle - What's the difference?

strengthen | settle | Related terms |

Strengthen is a related term of settle.


As verbs the difference between strengthen and settle

is that strengthen is (lb) to make strong or stronger; to add strength to; to increase the strength of; to fortify; to reinforce while settle is to place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home etc.

As a noun settle is

(archaic) a seat of any kind.

strengthen

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • (lb) To make strong or stronger; to add strength to; to increase the strength of; to fortify; to reinforce.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Let noble Warwick, Cobham, and the rest,/ With powerful policy strengthen themselves.
  • *1851 , Anonymous, Arthur Hamilton, and His Dog
  • *:A little hardship, and a little struggling with the rougher elements of life, will perchance but strengthen and increase his courage, and prepare him for the conflicts and struggles of after years.
  • (lb) To animate; to give moral strength to; to encourage; to fix in resolution; to hearten.
  • *(Bible), (w) iii. 28
  • *:Charge Joshua, and encourage him, and strengthen him.
  • *
  • *:"A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there.."
  • (lb) To augment; to improve; to intensify.
  • (lb) To grow strong or stronger.
  • Antonyms

    * atrophy

    Derived terms

    * strengthener

    settle

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Verb

    (settl)
  • To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home etc.
  • * And he settled his countenance steadfastly upon him,until he was ashamed. --2 Kings VIII. 11. (Rev. Ver.)
  • *
  • (transitive, obsolete, US) To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish.
  • To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to quieten; to still; to calm; to compose.
  • * (George Chapman)
  • God settled then the huge whale-bearing lake.
  • * (John Bunyan)
  • Hoping that sleep might settle his brains.
  • To clear or purify (a liquid) of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink
  • To restore (ground, roads etc.) or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition
  • To cause to sink; to lower
  • To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from uncertainty
  • * (Jonathan Swift)
  • It will settle the wavering, and confirm the doubtful.
  • To pacify (a discussion, quarrel).
  • (archaic) To adjust (accounts); to liquidate; to balance.
  • (colloquial) To pay.
  • to settle a bill
  • To colonize; to move people to (a land or territory).
  • To become fixed, permanent or stationary; to establish one's self or itself
  • * (Francis Bacon)
  • The wind came about and settled in the west.
  • * (John Arbuthnot)
  • Chyleruns through all the intermediate colors until it settles in an intense red.
  • To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home.
  • To become married, or a householder.
  • * (Matthew Prior)
  • As people marry now and settle .
  • To be established in a profession or in employment.
  • To become firm, dry, and hard, like the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared.
  • To become clear after being unclear or vague
  • * (Joseph Addison)
  • A government, on such occasions, is always thick before it settles .
  • To sink to the bottom of a body of liquid, for example dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reservoir.
  • To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, for example the foundation of a house, etc.
  • To become calm; to stop being agitated
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Till the fury of his highness settle , Come not before him.
  • To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement.
  • (obsolete) To make a jointure for a wife.
  • * (Samuel Garth)
  • He sighs with most success that settles well.

    Synonyms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Antonyms

    * (to place in a fixed or permanent condition) remove * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Derived terms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A seat of any kind.
  • * Hampole
  • upon the settle of his majesty
  • A long bench, often with a high back and arms, with storage space underneath for linen.
  • (obsolete) A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part.
  • * Bible, Ezekiel xliii. 14
  • And from the bottom upon the ground, even to the lower settle , shall be two cubits, and the breadth one cubit.