Senna vs Cassia - What's the difference?

senna | cassia |


In context|countable|lang=en terms the difference between senna and cassia

is that senna is (countable) any of several plants of the tribe cassieae, especially those of the genera cassia'' and ''senna , whose leaves and pods are used as a purgative and laxative while cassia is (countable) any of several tropical leguminous plants, of the genus cassia , used medicinally as senna.

In context|uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between senna and cassia

is that senna is (uncountable) the dried leaves or pods of these plants (especially of (taxlink) or (taxlink)) used medicinally while cassia is (uncountable) a spice (similar to cinnamon) made from the bark of the chinese cinnamon, (taxlink).

As nouns the difference between senna and cassia

is that senna is (countable) any of several plants of the tribe cassieae, especially those of the genera cassia'' and ''senna , whose leaves and pods are used as a purgative and laxative while cassia is (countable) any of several tropical leguminous plants, of the genus cassia , used medicinally as senna.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

senna

English

Noun

  • (countable) Any of several plants of the tribe Cassieae, especially those of the genera Cassia'' and ''Senna , whose leaves and pods are used as a purgative and laxative.
  • (uncountable) The dried leaves or pods of these plants (especially of ) used medicinally.
  • Derived terms

    * * bladder senna * ----

    cassia

    English

    Noun

  • (uncountable) The spice made from the bark of members of the genus Cinnamomum'' other than true cinnamon (''C. verum ), when they are distinguished from cinnamon.
  • (countable) Such trees themselves, particularly the Chinese cinnamon, Cinnamomum cassia
  • (countable) Any of several tropical leguminous plants, of the genus Cassia
  • (countable) Any of several tropical leguminous plants, of the genus Senna
  • (rft-sense) The sweet osmanthus (O. fragrans )
  • Usage notes

    Cassia is typically marketed in American English as "cinnamon" but is typically distinguished from Sri Lankan cinnamon in Europe. The oil content of the bark of the Saigon cinnamon is actually superior to that of true cinnamon, but Chinese cassia and Indonesian cinnamon have somewhat less. Sweet osmanthus]] and cassia were both formerly [[? in Chinese and the character is often translated as "cassia", owing to its greater importance in modern international trade; however, it is generally the sweet-smelling osmanthus that is meant.

    See also

    *(pedia) *(specieslite)

    References

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