Pride vs Self - What's the difference?

pride | self |


As a noun pride

is the quality or state of being proud; inordinate self-esteem; an unreasonable conceit of one's own superiority in talents, beauty, wealth, rank etc, which manifests itself in lofty airs, distance, reserve and often contempt of others.

As a verb pride

is (reflexive) to take or experience pride in something, be proud of it.

As a proper noun self is

.

pride

English

(wikipedia pride)

Noun

  • The quality or state of being proud; inordinate self-esteem; an unreasonable conceit of one's own superiority in talents, beauty, wealth, rank etc., which manifests itself in lofty airs, distance, reserve and often contempt of others.
  • A sense of one's own worth, and abhorrence of what is beneath or unworthy of one; lofty self-respect; noble self-esteem; elevation of character; dignified bearing; proud delight; -- in a good sense.
  • He took pride in his work.
    He had pride of ownership in his department.
  • * (rfdate) Macaulay
  • A people which takes no pride' in the noble achievements of remote ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with ' pride by remote descendants.
  • * (rfdate) (William Blake)
  • The pride of the peacock is the glory of God.
  • Proud or disdainful behavior or treatment; insolence or arrogance of demeanor; haughty bearing and conduct; insolent exultation; disdain; hubris.
  • * (rfdate) G. K. Chesterton, Introduction to Aesop's Fables
  • Pride goeth before the fall.
  • That of which one is proud; that which excites boasting or self-gratulation; the occasion or ground of self-esteem, or of arrogant and presumptuous confidence, as beauty, ornament, noble character, children etc.
  • * (rfdate) Spenser
  • lofty trees yclad with summer's pride
  • * (rfdate) Bible, Zech. ix. 6
  • I will cut off the pride of the Philistines.
  • * (rfdate) Goldsmith
  • a bold peasantry, their country's pride
  • (zoology) The small European lamprey species .
  • Show; ostentation; glory.
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare
  • Pride , pomp, and circumstance of glorious war.
  • Highest pitch; elevation reached; loftiness; prime; glory,
  • * to be in the pride of one's life.
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare
  • a falcon, towering in her pride of place
  • Consciousness of power; fullness of animal spirits; mettle; wantonness.
  • Lust; sexual desire; especially, excitement of sexual appetite in a female beast.
  • (zoology) A company of lions.
  • Synonyms

    * (lamprey species) prid, sandpiper * See also

    Derived terms

    * point of pride * pride comes before a fall * prideful

    Verb

  • (reflexive) To take or experience pride in something, be proud of it.
  • I pride myself on being a good judge of character, but pride goes before the fall and I'm not a good judge of my own character so I'm often wrong without knowing it.

    References

    (Webster 1913)

    self

    English

    (wikipedia self)

    Pronoun

    (English Pronouns)
  • (obsolete) Himself, herself, itself, themselves; that specific (person mentioned).
  • This argument was put forward by the defendant self .
  • Myself.
  • I made out a cheque, payable to self , which cheered me up somewhat.

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • The subject of one's own experience of phenomena: perception, emotions, thoughts.
  • *
  • *:Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self . It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
  • An individual person as the object of his own reflective consciousness (plural selves).
  • * (1788-1856)
  • *:The self , the I, is recognized in every act of intelligence as the subject to which that act belongs. It is I that perceive, I that imagine, I that remember, I that attend, I that compare, I that feel, I that will, I that am conscious.
  • *, chapter=16
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The preposterous altruism too!
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.}}
  • (lb) A seedling produced by self-pollination (plural selfs).
  • Derived terms

    * selfie

    See also

    * self- * person * I * ego

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (botany) To fertilise by the same individual; to self-fertilise or self-pollinate.
  • (botany) To fertilise by the same strain; to inbreed.
  • Antonyms

    * outcross

    Adjective

  • (obsolete) same
  • * 1605 , William Shakespeare, King Lear , I.i:
  • I am made of that self mettle as my sister.
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • on these self hills
  • * Dryden
  • At that self moment enters Palamon.