Generation vs Seed - What's the difference?

generation | seed |


As nouns the difference between generation and seed

is that generation is generation (act of generating) while seed is (senseid)(countable) a fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.

As a verb seed is

to plant or sow an area with seeds.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

generation

Noun

(en noun)
  • The fact of creating something, or bringing something into being; production, creation.
  • * 1832 , (Charles Lyell), Principles of Geology , II:
  • The generation of peat, when not completely under water, is confined to moist situations.
  • The act of creating a living creature or organism; procreation.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , IV.10:
  • So all things else, that nourish vitall blood, / Soone as with fury thou doest them inspire, / In generation seek to quench their inward fire.
  • * 1626 , (Francis Bacon), Sylva Sylvarum :
  • Generation by Copulation (certainly) extendeth not to Plants.
  • * c. 1605 , (William Shakespeare), Timon of Athens , First Folio 1623, I.3:
  • Thy Mothers of my generation : what's she, if I be a Dogge?
  • A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or degree in genealogy, the members of a family from the same parents, considered as a single unit.
  • This is the book of the generations of Adam - Genesis 5:1
    Ye shall remain there [in Babylon] many years, and for a long season, namely, seven generations - Baruch 6:3
    All generations and ages of the Christian church -
  • (obsolete) Descendants, progeny; offspring.
  • The average amount of time needed for children to grow up and have children of their own, generally considered to be a period of around thirty years, used as a measure of time.
  • * 2008 , Edgar Thorpe, Objective English :
  • Before the independence of India the books of Dr P. K. Yadav presented a fundamental challenge to the accepted ideas of race relations that, two generations later, will be true of the writings of the radical writers of the 1970s.
  • A set stage in the development of computing or of a specific technology.
  • * 2009 , Paul Deital, Harvey Deital and Abbey Deital, iPhone for Programmers :
  • The first-generation iPhone was released in June 2007 and was an instant blockbuster success.
  • (geometry) The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude, as a line, a surface, a solid, by the motion, in accordance with a mathematical law, of a point or a magnitude; as, the generation of a line or curve by the motion of a point, of a surface by a line, a sphere by a semicircle, etc.
  • A specific age range in which each person in that range can relate culturally to one another.
  • Generation X grew up in the eighties, whereas the generation known as the millennials grew up in the nineties.
  • A version of a form of pop culture which differs from later or earlier versions.
  • People sometimes dispute which generation of Star Trek is best, including the original and The Next Generation.

    Derived terms

    * alternate generation * generation gap * Generation X * spontaneous generation

    Anagrams

    * ----

    seed

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia seed)
  • (senseid)(countable) A fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • (countable, botany) A fertilized ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
  • (uncountable) An amount of fertilized grain that cannot be readily counted.
  • (uncountable) Semen.
  • (countable) A precursor.
  • (countable) The initial state, condition or position of a changing, growing or developing process; the ultimate precursor in a defined chain of precursors.
  • # The initial position of a competitor or team in a tournament. (seed position)
  • The team with the best regular season record receives the top seed in the conference tournament.
  • # The competitor or team occupying a given seed. (seed position)
  • The rookie was a surprising top seed .
  • # Initialization state of a . (seed number)
  • If you use the same seed you will get exactly the same pattern of numbers.
  • # Commercial message in a creative format placed on relevant sites on the Internet. (seed idea or seed message)
  • The latest seed has attracted a lot of users in our online community.
  • Offspring, descendants, progeny.
  • the seed of Abraham
  • * 1590 , , II.x:
  • Next him king Leyr in happie peace long raind, / But had no issue male him to succeed, / But three faire daughters, which were well vptraind, / In all that seemed fit for kingly seed
  • Race; generation; birth.
  • * Waller
  • Of mortal seed they were not held.

    Usage notes

    The common use of seed differs from the botanical use. The “seeds” of sunflowers are botanically fruits.

    Derived terms

    * crack seed * go to seed * seedcake * seedling * seed potato * seedy * spill one's seed

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To plant or sow an area with seeds.
  • I seeded my lawn with bluegrass.
  • To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • a sable mantle seeded with waking eyes
  • To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.
  • A venture capitalist seeds young companies.
    The tournament coordinator will seed the starting lineup with the best competitors from the qualifying round.
    The programmer seeded fresh, uncorrupted data into the database before running unit tests.
  • (sports, games) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
  • To be able to compete (especially in a quarter-final/semi-final/final).
  • The tennis player seeded into the quarters.
  • To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
  • Anagrams

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