Breed vs Seed - What's the difference?

breed | seed |


In lang=en terms the difference between breed and seed

is that breed is to have birth; to be produced or multiplied while seed is to start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.

As verbs the difference between breed and seed

is that breed is to produce offspring sexually; to bear young while seed is to plant or sow an area with seeds.

As nouns the difference between breed and seed

is that breed is all animals or plants of the same species or subspecies while seed is (senseid)(countable) a fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

breed

English

Alternative forms

* breede (archaic)

Verb

  • To produce offspring sexually; to bear young.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • To give birth to; to be the native place of.
  • a pond breeds''' fish; a northern country '''breeds stout men
  • * Shakespeare
  • Yet every mother breeds not sons alike.
  • Of animals, to mate.
  • To keep animals and have them reproduce in a way that improves the next generation’s qualities.
  • To arrange the mating of specific animals.
  • To propagate or grow plants trying to give them certain qualities.
  • To take care of in infancy and through childhood; to bring up.
  • * Dryden
  • to bring thee forth with pain, with care to breed
  • * Everett
  • born and bred on the verge of the wilderness
  • To yield or result in.
  • * Milton
  • Lest the place / And my quaint habits breed astonishment.
  • (obsolete) To be formed in the parent or dam; to be generated, or to grow, like young before birth.
  • To educate; to instruct; to form by education; to train; sometimes followed by up .
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • No care was taken to breed him a Protestant.
  • * John Locke
  • His farm may not remove his children too far from him, or the trade he breeds them up in.
  • To produce or obtain by any natural process.
  • * John Locke
  • Children would breed their teeth with less danger.
  • To have birth; to be produced or multiplied.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Heavens rain grace / On that which breeds between them.

    Synonyms

    * (take care of in infancy and through childhood) raise, bring up, rear

    Derived terms

    * breeder * breeding * breed in the bone

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • All animals or plants of the same species or subspecies.
  • a breed of tulip
    a breed of animal
  • A race or lineage.
  • (informal) A group of people with shared characteristics.
  • People who were taught classical Greek and Latin at school are a dying breed .

    Anagrams

    * English irregular verbs ----

    seed

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia seed)
  • (senseid)(countable) A fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • (countable, botany) A fertilized ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
  • (uncountable) An amount of fertilized grain that cannot be readily counted.
  • (uncountable) Semen.
  • (countable) A precursor.
  • (countable) The initial state, condition or position of a changing, growing or developing process; the ultimate precursor in a defined chain of precursors.
  • # The initial position of a competitor or team in a tournament. (seed position)
  • The team with the best regular season record receives the top seed in the conference tournament.
  • # The competitor or team occupying a given seed. (seed position)
  • The rookie was a surprising top seed .
  • # Initialization state of a . (seed number)
  • If you use the same seed you will get exactly the same pattern of numbers.
  • # Commercial message in a creative format placed on relevant sites on the Internet. (seed idea or seed message)
  • The latest seed has attracted a lot of users in our online community.
  • Offspring, descendants, progeny.
  • the seed of Abraham
  • * 1590 , , II.x:
  • Next him king Leyr in happie peace long raind, / But had no issue male him to succeed, / But three faire daughters, which were well vptraind, / In all that seemed fit for kingly seed
  • Race; generation; birth.
  • * Waller
  • Of mortal seed they were not held.

    Usage notes

    The common use of seed differs from the botanical use. The “seeds” of sunflowers are botanically fruits.

    Derived terms

    * crack seed * go to seed * seedcake * seedling * seed potato * seedy * spill one's seed

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To plant or sow an area with seeds.
  • I seeded my lawn with bluegrass.
  • To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • a sable mantle seeded with waking eyes
  • To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.
  • A venture capitalist seeds young companies.
    The tournament coordinator will seed the starting lineup with the best competitors from the qualifying round.
    The programmer seeded fresh, uncorrupted data into the database before running unit tests.
  • (sports, games) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
  • To be able to compete (especially in a quarter-final/semi-final/final).
  • The tennis player seeded into the quarters.
  • To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
  • Anagrams

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