Bede vs Sede - What's the difference?

bede | sede |


As an adjective bede

is motherless.

As a noun sede is

.

bede

English

Alternative forms

* bead

Etymology 1

From (etyl) , from (etyl). Cognate with (etyl) gebed and bede, (etyl) Gebet.

Noun

(en-noun)
  • prayer, request, supplication
  • * 1875 March, in Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science , Volume 15 Number 87:
  • Thus originated the alms-(or bede -) houses so frequently met with in the retired villages of England.
  • * 1885 , Richard F. Burton, The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night :
  • By Allah thy bede is good indeed and right is thy rede!
  • * 2008 , Time to Ditch St. George :
  • because miracles had frequently been done at his burial-place, even at the bede -house where he was buried.
  • * 2011 , Where Did Beaded Flowers Come From? :
  • Because of the length of the original rosary, it became customary to pay someone, usually a resident of an almshouse, to recite the prayers. These people were referred to as bede women or men, and it was they who made the first bead flowers.
  • order, command
  • rosary
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . See also (l).

    Verb

  • pray, offer, proffer
  • * 1500 , The Towneley Plays :
  • Sir, a bargan bede I you.
  • request, demand, order, command, forbid
  • proclaim, declare
  • * (rfdate) Le Mort Arthur :
  • A turnement were best to bede .
  • present, counsel, advise, rede, exhort
  • * 1450 , Merlin :
  • They of londone boden hem to ben lyht of herte.

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (mining) A kind of pickaxe.
  • References
    (Webster 1913) * Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, 1911 * Middle English Dictionary ----

    sede

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • See also

    * supersede

    Anagrams

    * ----