Quarter vs Season - What's the difference?

quarter | season |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between quarter and season

is that quarter is (obsolete) to drive a carriage so as to prevent the wheels from going into the ruts, or so that a rut shall be between the wheels while season is (obsolete) to copulate with; to impregnate.

In lang=en terms the difference between quarter and season

is that quarter is to lodge; to have a temporary residence while season is to become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun.

As nouns the difference between quarter and season

is that quarter is any one of four equal parts into which something has been divided while season is each of the four divisions of a year: spring, summer, autumn and winter; yeartide.

As verbs the difference between quarter and season

is that quarter is to divide into quarters or quarter can be (obsolete) to drive a carriage so as to prevent the wheels from going into the ruts, or so that a rut shall be between the wheels while season is to flavour food with spices, herbs or salt.

As an adjective quarter

is pertaining to an aspect of a.

quarter

English

Etymology 1

Via (etyl) quartier, from (etyl) quartarius, from quartus.

Adjective

(-) (also spelled with prefix (quarter-))
  • Pertaining to an aspect of a .
  • (chiefly) Consisting of a fourth part, a quarter (1/4, 25%).
  • * A quarter''' hour; a '''quarter''' century; a '''quarter''' note; a '''quarter pound.
  • (chiefly) Related to a three-month term, a quarter of a year.
  • * A quarter day is one terminating a quarter of the year.
  • * A quarter session is one held quarterly at the end of a quarter.
  • Derived terms
    * quarter blanket * quarter bottle * quarter century * quarter crack * quarter day * quarter final * quarter horse * quarter hour * quarter moon * quarter note * quarter pound * quarter session * quarter waiter * quarter year

    Noun

  • Any one of four equal parts into which something has been divided.
  • (US, Canada) A coin worth 25 cents (1/4 of a dollar).
  • A period of three consecutive months (1/4 of a year).
  • A section or area (of a town, etc.).
  • (uncountable) Accommodation granted to a defeated opponent
  • * 1955 , J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King , HarperCollinsPublishers (2007), p. 1110.
  • Hard fighting and long labour they had still; for the Southrons were bold men and grim, and fierce in despair, and the Easterlings were strong and war-hardened and asked for no quarter .
  • An old English measure of corn, containing 8 bushels.
  • * 1882 , James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England , volume 4, p. 204.
  • One of these is 1 Hen. V, cap. 10, defining the quarter of corn to be eight struck bushels, and putting fines on purveyors who take more.
  • An old English measure of cloth, nine inches or four nails
  • (historical) Each of the four divisions or watches of a twelve-hour night.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , Mark VI:
  • And aboute the fourth quartre of the nyght, he cam unto them, walkinge apon the see [...].
  • (heraldiccharge) A charge made up of a quarter of the shield, larger than a canton, and normally on the upper dexter side, formed by a perpendicular line from the top meeting a horizontal line from the side.
  • That part on either side of a horse's hoof between the toe and heel, being the side of the coffin.
  • * 1877 , (Anna Sewell), (Black Beauty) Chapter 23[http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Black_Beauty/23]
  • ...at last she kicked right over the carriage pole and fell down, after giving me a severe blow on my near quarter .
  • (nautical) The aftmost part of a vessel's side, roughly from the last mast to the stern.
  • (obsolete) Friendship; amity; concord.
  • * Shakespeare
  • In quarter , and in terms like bride and groom.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • I knew two that were competitors for the secretary's place, and yet kept good quarter between themselves.
  • A quartermaster sergeant; a quartermaster.
  • * 1925 , (Ford Madox Ford), No More Parades'', Penguin 2012 (''Parade's End ), p. 360:
  • Tietjens said: ‘Send the Canadian sergeant-major to me at the double….’ to the quarter .
    Synonyms
    * (one of four equal parts ): fourth, fourth part, * (period of three consecutive months ): trimester * (section of a town ): borough, district, region
    Derived terms
    * fat quarter * quarterly * quarters * quarter of * quarter past * quarter to

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To divide into quarters.
  • To provide housing for military personnel or other equipment.
  • Quarter the horses in the third stable.
  • To lodge; to have a temporary residence.
  • References

    ; Adjective * "quarter" at Merriam-Webster * "quarter" in Harrap's Shorter , 2006, p. 761

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) cartayer

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To drive a carriage so as to prevent the wheels from going into the ruts, or so that a rut shall be between the wheels.
  • Every creature that met us would rely on us for quartering — De Quincey.
    ----

    season

    English

    (wikipedia season)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Each of the four divisions of a year: spring, summer, autumn and winter; yeartide.
  • * Addison
  • the several seasons of the year in their beauty
  • A part of a year when something particular happens: mating season'', ''rainy season'', ''football season .
  • *
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=Then there came a reg'lar terror of a sou'wester same as you don't get one summer in a thousand, and blowed the shanty flat and ripped about half of the weir poles out of the sand. We spent consider'ble money getting 'em reset, and then a swordfish got into the pound and tore the nets all to slathers, right in the middle of the squiteague season .}}
  • (obsolete) That which gives relish; seasoning.
  • * 1599 , (William Shakespeare), (Much Ado About Nothing) ,
  • O! she is fallen
    Into a pit of ink, that the wide sea
    Hath drops too few to wash her clean again,
    And salt too little which may season give
    To her foul-tainted flesh.
  • * 1605 , (Shakespeare), The Tragedy of Macbeth, III, 4
  • You lack the season of all natures, sleep.
  • (cricket) The period over which a series of Test matches are played.
  • (North America, broadcasting) A group of episodes of a television or radio program broadcast in regular intervals with a long break between each group, usually with one year between the beginning of each.
  • The third season of ''Friends'' aired from 1996 to 1997.
  • (obsolete) An extended, undefined period of time.
  • * 1656 , , The Mortification of Sin
  • So it is in a person when a breach hath been made upon his conscience, quiet, perhaps credit, by his lust, in some eruption of actual sin; — carefulness, indignation, desire, fear, revenge are all set on work about it and against it, and lust is quiet for a season , being run down before them; but when the hurry is over and the inquest is past, the thief appears again alive, and is as busy as ever at his work.

    Usage notes

    In British English, a year-long group of episodes is called a series, whereas in North American English the word "series" is a synonym of "program" or "show".

    Synonyms

    * (l) * (l)

    Derived terms

    * end-of-season * high season * in season * low season * mating season * midseason * mid-season form * open season * out of season * rutting season * seasonable * seasonal * seasonally * silly season * unseasonally * unseasonable * unseasonably

    Verb

  • To flavour food with spices, herbs or salt.
  • To make fit for any use by time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate.
  • Hence, to prepare by drying or hardening, or removal of natural juices; as, to season timber.
  • To become mature; to grow fit for use; to become adapted to a climate.
  • To become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun.
  • (obsolete) To copulate with; to impregnate.
  • (Holland)

    Anagrams

    *