Years vs Sears - What's the difference?

years | sears |


As a noun years

is .

As a proper noun sears is

.

years

English

Noun

(head)
  • .
  • * 1981 , May 5 1718-PDT, Jim McGrath, Earliest Usenet use via Google Groups: fa.sf-lovers , said with a smile at an awards ceremony in the Pennsylvania state Capitol
  • It will be a shorter book and it will not start four million years ago.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= In the News , passage=Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: the ability to convert water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and waste oxygen using solar energy.}}
  • (colloquial, hyperbole) An unusually long time.
  • Synonyms

    * (unusually long time) ages, yonks, for ever,

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    *

    sears

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (sear)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    sear

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) * (l)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) seer, seere, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Dry; withered, especially of vegetation.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) seeren, seren, from (etyl) , Greek hauos'' ("dry"), Sanskrit ''s?sa'' ("drought"). The use in firearms terminology may relate to French ''serrer ("to grip").

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To char, scorch, or burn the surface of something with a hot instrument.
  • To wither; to dry up.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (figurative) To mark permanently, as if by burning.
  • The events of that day were seared into her memory.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A scar produced by searing
  • Part of a gun that retards the hammer until the trigger is pulled.
  • Anagrams

    * ----