Score vs Worm - What's the difference?

score | worm |


As nouns the difference between score and worm

is that score is the total number of points earned by a participant in a game while worm is a generally tubular invertebrate of the annelid phylum.

As verbs the difference between score and worm

is that score is (intransitive)  to earn points in a game while worm is to make (one's way) with a crawling motion.

score

English

(wikipedia score)

Noun

(en noun)
  • The total number of points earned by a participant in a game.
  • The number of points accrued by each of the participants in a game, expressed as a ratio or a series of numbers.
  • The performance of an individual or group on an examination or test, expressed by a number, letter, or other symbol; a grade.
  • (cricket) A presentation of how many runs a side has scored, and how many wickets have been lost.
  • (cricket) The number of runs scored by a batsman, or by a side, in either an innings or a match.
  • Twenty, 20 (number ).
  • * 1863 November 19, (Abraham Lincoln), , based on the signed "Bliss Copy"
  • "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal."
  • A distance of twenty yards, in ancient archery and gunnery.
  • (Halliwell)
  • A weight of twenty pounds.
  • (music) One or more parts of a musical composition in a format indicating how the composition is to be played.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-29, volume=407, issue=8842, page=55, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Travels and travails , passage=Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.}}
  • Subject.
  • * 2005 , (Plato), Sophist . Translation by Lesley Brown. .
  • Well, although we haven't discussed the views of all those who make precise reckonings of being and not [being], we've done enough on that score .
  • Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
  • * Hudibras
  • But left the trade, as many more / Have lately done on the same score .
  • * Dryden
  • You act your kindness in Cydria's score .
  • A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used.
  • An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; hence, indebtedness.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He parted well, and paid his score .
  • (US, crime, slang) A robbery; a criminal act.
  • (US, crime, slang) A bribe paid to a police officer.
  • (US, crime, slang) An illegal sale, especially of drugs.
  • (US, crime, slang) A prostitute's client.
  • (US, slang) A sexual conquest.
  • Synonyms

    * (sense, prostitute's client) see

    Derived terms

    * go off at score * scorecard * film score * threescore * fourscore * scoreless

    Verb

    (scor)
  • To earn points in a game.
  • Pelé scores again!
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 29 , author=Jon Smith , title=Tottenham 3 - 1 Shamrock Rovers , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=And White Hart Lane was stunned when Rovers scored just five minutes after the restart in front of their away following.}}
  • To earn (points) in a game.
  • It is unusual for a team to score a hundred goals in one game.
  • To achieve (a score) in e.g. a test.
  • * 2004 , Diane McGuinness, Early reading instruction: what science really tells up about how to teach readin
  • At the end of first grade, the children scored 80 percent correct on this test, a value that remained unchanged through third grade.
  • To record (the score) for a game or a match.
  • To scratch (paper or cardboard) with a sharp implement to make it easier to fold.
  • To make fine, shallow lines with a sharp implement, for example as cutting indications.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=Foreword citation , passage=A very neat old woman, still in her good outdoor coat and best beehive hat, was sitting at a polished mahogany table on whose surface there were several scored scratches so deep that a triangular piece of the veneer had come cleanly away, […].}}
    The baker scored the cake so the servers would know where to slice it.
  • (slang) To have sexual intercourse.
  • Chris finally scored with Pat last week.
  • (slang) To acquire or gain.
  • Did you score tickets for the concert?
  • To obtain something desired.
  • * 1919 ,
  • "Of course it would be hypocritical for me to pretend that I regret what Abraham did. After all, I've scored by it."
  • To provide (a film, etc.) with a musical score.
  • (US, crime, slang, transitive, of a police officer) To extract a bribe.
  • Derived terms

    * scorable * score a brace * score off, score-off * unscored

    Interjection

    (en-interjection)!
  • (US, slang) Acknowledgement of success
  • See also

    * grade

    References

    * Tom Dalzell, The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English , 2008, page 846

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    worm

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A generally tubular invertebrate of the annelid phylum.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=7 citation , passage=‘Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. […]’}}
  • A contemptible or devious being.
  • * Bible, Psalms xxii. 6
  • I am a worm , and no man.
  • (computing) A self-replicating program that propagates through a network.
  • (cricket) A graphical representation of the total runs scored in an innings.
  • Anything helical, especially the thread of a screw.
  • * Moxon
  • The threads of screws, when bigger than can be made in screw plates, are called worms .
  • # A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms.
  • # (anatomy) A muscular band in the tongue of some animals, such as dogs; the lytta.
  • # The condensing tube of a still, often curved and wound to save space.
  • # A short revolving screw whose threads drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel or rack by gearing into its teeth.
  • (archaic) A dragon or mythological serpent.
  • (obsolete) Any creeping or crawling animal, such as a snake, snail, or caterpillar.
  • * Tyndale (Acts xxviii. 3, 4)
  • There came a viper out of the heat, and leapt on his hand. When the men of the country saw the worm hang on his hand, they said, This man must needs be a murderer.
  • * Shakespeare
  • 'Tis slander, / Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue / Outvenoms all the worms of Nile.
  • * Longfellow
  • When Cerberus perceived us, the great worm , / His mouth he opened and displayed his tusks.
  • An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one's mind with remorse.
  • Richard III ,
  • (math) A strip of linked tiles sharing parallel edges in a tiling.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To make (one's way) with a crawling motion.
  • :
  • To work one's way by artful or devious means.
  • *(George Herbert) (1593-1633)
  • *:When debates and fretting jealousy / Did worm and work within you more and more, / Your colour faded.
  • To work (one's way or oneself) (into) gradually or slowly; to insinuate.
  • :
  • To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out .
  • *(Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • *:They find themselves wormed out of all power.
  • To "worm out of", to "drag out of" (often: "drag every word out of someone"), to get information that someone is reluctant or unwilling to give (through artful or devious means or by pleading or asking repeatedly). Often combined with expressions such as "It's like pulling teeth" or "It's like getting blood out of a stone".
  • *(Charles Dickens) (1812-1870)
  • *:Theywormed things out of me that I had no desire to tell.
  • *
  • *:He nodded. "Mum's the word, Mrs. Bunting! It'll all be in the last editions of the evening newspapers—it can't be kep' out. There'd be too much of a row if twas!" ¶ "Are you going off to that public-house now?" she asked. ¶ "I've got a awk'ard job—to try and worm something out of the barmaid."
  • To fill in the contlines of a rope before parcelling and serving.
  • :
  • *1841 , Benjamin J. Totten], [http://books.google.com.au/books?id=w0VJAAAAYAAJ Naval Text-Book :
  • *:Ropesare generally wormed before they are served.
  • (label) To deworm an animal.
  • (label) To move with one's body dragging the ground.
  • *1919 , , How animals talk: and other pleasant studies of birds and beast?
  • *:Inch by inch I wormed along the secret passageway, flat to the ground, not once raising my head, hardly daring to pull a full breath.
  • (label) To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of (a dog, etc.) for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw, and formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:The men assisted the laird in his sporting parties, wormed his dogs, and cut the ears of his terrier puppies.
  • (label) To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm.
  • Derived terms

    * blindworm * bollworm * bookworm * cutworm * the early bird catches the worm * earthworm * fishing worm * flatworm * glowworm * hornworm * lugworm * penis worm * ringworm * silkworm * slowworm * tapeworm * woodworm * the worm has turned * wormhole * worm lizard * worm’s-eye view]], [[worm's eye view, worm’s eye view * wormwood * wormy

    See also

    * caterpillar * grub * lumbricine * maggot * Trojan horse * vermian * vermiform * virus

    References

    * [http://www.thefreedictionary.com/worm] The Free Dictionary , Farlex Inc., 2010. ----