Converse vs Scarper - What's the difference?

converse | scarper |


As verbs the difference between converse and scarper

is that converse is while scarper is (british|slang) to run away; to flee; to escape.

converse

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl)

Verb

(convers)
  • (formal) To talk; to engage in conversation.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Companions / That do converse and waste the time together.
  • * Dryden
  • We had conversed so often on that subject.
  • To keep company; to hold intimate intercourse; to commune; followed by with .
  • * Thomson
  • To seek the distant hills, and there converse / With nature.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • Conversing with the world, we use the world's fashions.
  • * Wordsworth
  • But to converse with heaven — This is not easy.
  • (obsolete) To have knowledge of (a thing), from long intercourse or study.
  • * John Locke
  • according as the objects they converse with afford greater or less variety
    Derived terms
    * conversation

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Familiar discourse; free interchange of thoughts or views; conversation; chat.
  • * 1728 , (Edward Young), Love of Fame, the Universal Passion , Satire V, On Women, lines 44-46:
  • Twice ere the sun descends, with zeal inspir'd, / From the vain converse of the world retir'd, / She reads the psalms and chapters for the day [...].
  • * 1919 , (Saki), ‘The Disappearance of Crispina Umerleigh’, The Toys of Peace'', Penguin 2000 (''Complete Short Stories ), p. 405:
  • In a first-class carriage of a train speeding Balkanward across the flat, green Hungarian plain, two Britons sat in friendly, fitful converse .

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Opposite; reversed in order or relation; reciprocal.
  • a converse proposition

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The opposite or reverse.
  • (logic) Of a proposition or theorem of the form: given that "If A is true, then B is true", then "If B is true, then A is true."''
    equivalently: ''given that "All Xs are Ys", then "All Ys are Xs"
    .
  • All trees are plants, but the converse , that all plants are trees, is not true.
    Derived terms
    * conversely

    Anagrams

    * * English heteronyms ----

    scarper

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (British, slang) To run away; to flee; to escape.
  • * 1904 , John Coleman, Fifty years of an actors? life , Volume 1, page 54,
  • Out went the lights, as he continued, "That sneak Whiskers have just blown the gaff to old Slow-Coach, and he'll be here in two two's to give you beans — so scarper', laddies — ' scarper ! "
  • * 2001 , Ardal O'Hanlon, Knick Knack Paddy Whack , page 7,
  • The tramps scarpered', the street-traders pushing prams '''scarpered''', half of Dublin ' scarpered as if they all had something to hide.
  • * 2007 , , [http://observer.guardian.co.uk/politics/story/0,,2132043,00.html]
  • Helm writes: 'As if she were some street criminal, ready to scarper , Ruth's home was swooped upon by [Assistant Commissioner John] Yates's men and she was forced to dress in the presence of a female police officer.

    Anagrams

    * *