Lecture vs Scald - What's the difference?

lecture | scald |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between lecture and scald

is that lecture is (obsolete) the act of reading while scald is (obsolete) paltry; worthless.

As nouns the difference between lecture and scald

is that lecture is (senseid) a spoken lesson or exposition, usually delivered to a group while scald is a burn, or injury to the skin or flesh, by hot liquid or steam or scald can be (obsolete) scaliness; a scabby skin disease or scald can be .

As verbs the difference between lecture and scald

is that lecture is (senseid)(ambitransitive) to teach (somebody) by giving a speech on a given topic while scald is to burn with hot liquid.

As an adjective scald is

(obsolete) affected with the scab; scabby.

lecture

Noun

(en noun)
  • (senseid) A spoken lesson or exposition, usually delivered to a group.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=The stories did not seem to me to touch life. […] They left me with the impression of a well-delivered stereopticon lecture , with characters about as life-like as the shadows on the screen, and whisking on and off, at the mercy of the operator.}}
  • A berating or scolding.
  • (obsolete) The act of reading.
  • Verb

    (lectur)
  • (senseid)(ambitransitive) To teach (somebody) by giving a speech on a given topic.
  • To preach, to berate, to scold.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=(Gary Younge)
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution , passage=The dispatches […] also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies. Having lectured the Arab world about democracy for years, its collusion in suppressing freedom was undeniable as protesters were met by weaponry and tear gas made in the west, employed by a military trained by westerners.}}

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * lecturer

    scald

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl),

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To burn with hot liquid.
  • to scald the hand
  • * 1605 , , IV. vii. 48:
  • Mine own tears / Do scald like molten lead.
  • * Cowley
  • Here the blue flames of scalding brimstone fall.
  • (cooking) To heat almost to boiling.
  • Scald the milk until little bubbles form.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A burn, or injury to the skin or flesh, by hot liquid or steam.
  • Etymology 2

    Alteration of (scall).

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Scaliness; a scabby skin disease.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , I.vii:
  • Her craftie head was altogether bald, / And as in hate of honorable eld, / Was ouergrowne with scurfe and filthy scald .
  • *, II.12:
  • Some heale Horses, some cure men, some the plague, some the scald .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Affected with the scab; scabby.
  • * 1599 , , III. i. 110:
  • and let us knog our / prains together to be revenge on this same scald , scurvy, / cogging companion,
  • (obsolete) Paltry; worthless.
  • * 1598 , , V. ii. 215:
  • Saucy lictors / Will catch at us like strumpets, and scald rhymers / Ballad us out o' tune.

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A war song such as was of yore chanted on the field of battle by the scalds of the yet heathen Saxons. — Sir Walter Scott.
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * *

    References

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