Raxes vs Saxes - What's the difference?

raxes | saxes |


As a verb raxes

is (rax).

As a noun saxes is

.

raxes

English

Verb

(head)
  • (rax)

  • rax

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) raxen, .

    Verb

    (es)
  • (UK, dialectal, Northern England, Scotland, transitive) To stretch; stretch out.
  • * 1974 , Guy Davenport, Tatlin! :
  • Shoeless, he stood naked on his toes, his arms raxed upwards.
  • (UK, dialectal, Northern England, Scotland, transitive) To reach out; reach or attain to.
  • (UK, dialectal, Northern England, Scotland, transitive) To extend the hand to; hand or pass something.
  • Please rax me the pitcher.
  • * 1825 , John Wilson, Robert Shelton Mackenzie, James Hogg, William Maginn and John Gibson Lockhart, Noctes Ambrosianæ No. XVIII'', in ''Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine , vol. 17:
  • Wha the mischief set him on reading me? I'm sure he could never read onything in a dacent-like way since he was cleckit—rax' me the Queen, and I'll let you hear a bit that will gar your hearts dinnle again—' rax me the Queen, I say.
  • (UK, dialectal, Northern England, Scotland, intransitive) To perform the act of reaching or stretching; stretch one's self; reach for or try to obtain something
  • (UK, dialectal, chiefly, Scotland, intransitive) To stretch after sleep.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    Shortening of barracks.

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • barracks
  • * {{quote-video
  • , date = 2014-03-19 , title = , medium = Film , at = 44:28 , people = Clinton "Fear" Loomis , passage = Eventually they just broke our base and took out every single one of our raxes . }} ----

    saxes

    English

    Noun

    (head)