Budge vs Saunter - What's the difference?

budge | saunter | Related terms |

Budge is a related term of saunter.


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between budge and saunter

is that budge is (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics while saunter is (obsolete) a place for sauntering or strolling.

As verbs the difference between budge and saunter

is that budge is to move while saunter is to stroll, or walk at a leisurely pace.

As nouns the difference between budge and saunter

is that budge is a kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits while saunter is a leisurely walk or stroll.

As an adjective budge

is (obsolete) brisk; stirring; jocund or budge can be (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics.

budge

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) bouger.

Alternative forms

* budg (obsolete)

Verb

(budg)
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but it won’t budge an inch.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll not budge an inch, boy.
  • * 2014 , Jacob Steinberg, " Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian , 9 March 2014:
  • Yet goals in either half from Jordi Gómez and James Perch inspired them and then, in the face of a relentless City onslaught, they simply would not budge , throwing heart, body and soul in the way of a ball which seemed destined for their net on several occasions.
  • To move.
  • I’ve been pushing this rock as hard as I can, but I can’t budge it.
  • To yield in one’s opinions or beliefs.
  • The Minister for Finance refused to budge on the new economic rules.
  • To try to improve the spot of a decision on a sports field.
  • Derived terms
    * budge up * budger
    Synonyms
    * shift

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
  • (South)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on, formerly used as an edging and ornament, especially on scholastic habits.
  • * Milton
  • They are become so liberal, as to part freely with their own budge -gowns from off their backs.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) austere or stiff, like scholastics
  • * Milton
  • Those budge doctors of the stoic fur.
    Derived terms
    * budge bachelor * budge barrel (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *

    saunter

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To stroll, or walk at a leisurely pace
  • * Masson
  • One could lie under elm trees in a lawn, or saunter in meadows by the side of a stream.

    Synonyms

    * amble * stroll * wander

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A leisurely walk or stroll.
  • * 1814 , Elizabeth Hervey, Amabel: Volume 1 (page 53)
  • Caroline
  • A leisurely pace.
  • (obsolete) A place for sauntering or strolling.
  • * Young
  • That wheel of fops, that saunter of the town.

    References

    Anagrams

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