Saturate vs Satiate - What's the difference?

saturate | satiate |


As verbs the difference between saturate and satiate

is that saturate is to cause to become completely penetrated, impregnated, or soaked (especially with a liquid) while satiate is to fill to satisfaction; to satisfy.

As an adjective satiate is

filled to satisfaction or to excess.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

saturate

English

Verb

(saturat)
  • To cause to become completely penetrated, impregnated, or soaked (especially with a liquid).
  • * 1815 , in the Annals of Philosophy , volume 6, page 332:
  • Suppose, on the contrary, that a piece of charcoal saturated with hydrogen gas is put into a receiver filled with carbonic acid gas,
  • * Macaulay
  • Innumerable flocks and herbs covered that vast expanse of emerald meadow saturated with the moisture of the Atlantic.
    Rain saturated their clothes.
    After walking home in the driving rain, his clothes were saturated .
  • To satisfy the affinity of; to cause a substance to become inert by chemical combination with all that it can hold.
  • One can saturate phosphorus with chlorine.

    Anagrams

    * ----

    satiate

    English

    Verb

    (satiat)
  • To fill to satisfaction; to satisfy.
  • Nothing seemed to satiate her desire for knowledge.
  • To satisfy to excess. To fill to satiety.
  • Usage notes

    Used interchangeably with, and more common than, sate.Monthly Gleanings: November 2011]: Sate'' versus ''satiated''.”, ''[http://blog.oup.com/ OUPblog

    Synonyms

    * sate

    Derived terms

    * satiated

    References

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Filled to satisfaction or to excess.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • satiate of applause