Scoff vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

scoff | sarcasm |


As nouns the difference between scoff and sarcasm

is that scoff is derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach or scoff can be (south africa) food while sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As a verb scoff

is to jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision or scoff can be (british) to eat food quickly.

scoff

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare (etyl) skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph.

Noun

(en noun)
  • Derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
  • * Shakespeare
  • With scoffs , and scorns, and contumelious taunts.
  • * 1852 , The Dublin University Magazine (page 66)
  • There were sneers, and scoffs , and inuendoes of some; prophecies of failure in a hundred ways
  • An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
  • * Cowper
  • The scoff of withered age and beardless youth.
    Synonyms
    * derision, ridicule * See also

    Verb

  • To jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision.
  • * Goldsmith
  • Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, / And fools who came to scoff , remained to pray.
    Synonyms
    * contemn, deride, sneer

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (South Africa) Food.
  • Verb

  • (British) To eat food quickly.
  • (South Africa) To eat.
  • Synonyms
    * (eat quickly) (l), (l) (US)

    See also

    * scuff

    sarcasm

    English

    Noun

  • (uncountable) A sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis. Insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Although the Celebrity was almost impervious to sarcasm , he was now beginning to exhibit visible signs of uneasiness, the consciousness dawning upon him that his eccentricity was not receiving the ovation it merited.}}
  • (countable) An act of sarcasm.
  • Synonyms

    * (uncountable) derision, facetiousness, irony, ridicule, satire * (countable) taunt, gibe

    Derived terms

    * sarcastic